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saveliberty

How American Food Got Bad

 

Veronique de Rugy

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I just finished my colleague Tyler Cowen’s newest book, An Economist Gets Lunch. While I thought the whole thing was interesting, and highly entertaining at times, my favorite chapter is one called “How American Food Got Bad.”

 

While the standard explanation blames bad American food on commercialization, capitalism, and the inability of individuals to choose what’s best for them, Tyler tells a story that starts with the war on alcohol (prohibition and states’ restrictions on public sales) that led many top-quality restaurants to close down once they couldn’t subsidize good food with the profits made on drinks anymore (see cross-subsidies below), and the war that started in the ’20s against immigration and “kept American food away from its best and most fruitful innovators for decades.” He also explains how the Second World War contributed to the trend as it “shoved America into a trough of high volume, low quality junk” along with the several decades it took for American food to adapt to the “two-income family and the dominance of television as a way of spending time.”

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saveliberty

“The flat, brute, highly sexualized thing we call our culture”

 

April 20, 2012 By Deacon Greg Kandra 1 Comment

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A solid, sobering read by Peggy Noonan this Friday — and one that should make a lot of people sit and look around and worry:

 

People in politics talk about the right track/wrong track numbers as an indicator of public mood. This week Gallup had a poll showing only 24% of Americans feel we’re on the right track as a nation. That’s a historic low. Political professionals tend, understandably, to think it’s all about the economy—unemployment, foreclosures, we’re going in the wrong direction. I’ve long thought that public dissatisfaction is about more than the economy, that it’s also about our culture, or rather the flat, brute, highly sexualized thing we call our culture.

 

Now I’d go a step beyond that. I think more and more people are worried about the American
character
—who we are and what kind of adults we are raising.

 

Every story that has broken through the past few weeks has been about who we are as a people. And they are all disturbing.

 

*********

I know, it's Peggy Noonan, but it is a good read through the end.

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“The flat, brute, highly sexualized thing we call our culture”

 

April 20, 2012 By Deacon Greg Kandra 1 Comment

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A solid, sobering read by Peggy Noonan this Friday — and one that should make a lot of people sit and look around and worry:

 

 

People in politics talk about the right track/wrong track numbers as an indicator of public mood. This week Gallup had a poll showing only 24% of Americans feel we’re on the right track as a nation. That’s a historic low. Political professionals tend, understandably, to think it’s all about the economy—unemployment, foreclosures, we’re going in the wrong direction. I’ve long thought that public dissatisfaction is about more than the economy, that it’s also about our culture, or rather the flat, brute, highly sexualized thing we call our culture.

 

Now I’d go a step beyond that. I think more and more people are worried about the American
character
—who we are and what kind of adults we are raising.

 

Every story that has broken through the past few weeks has been about who we are as a people. And they are all disturbing.

 

*********

I know, it's Peggy Noonan, but it is a good read through the end.

 

This was a good read, @saveliberty. It reminds me of a conversation we had here a couple of days ago about nothing worth watching on TV. You can scroll down 99 channels on basic cable and find nothing but crap and/or 24/7 news channels with pundits interrupting and talking over each other in louder and louder voices.

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clearvision

Zimmerman was given 150K bond. Quite a bit was covered in testimony. At least today they have no evidence of who confronted who. His head was injured. When police asked if they knew about broken nose.... no. Asked if they wanted the medical record. Ugg. It was pathetic.

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“The flat, brute, highly sexualized thing we call our culture” April 20, 2012 By Deacon Greg Kandra 1 Comment Scissors-32x32.pngA solid, sobering read by Peggy Noonan this Friday — and one that should make a lot of people sit and look around and worry:
People in politics talk about the right track/wrong track numbers as an indicator of public mood. This week Gallup had a poll showing only 24% of Americans feel we’re on the right track as a nation. That’s a historic low. Political professionals tend, understandably, to think it’s all about the economy—unemployment, foreclosures, we’re going in the wrong direction. I’ve long thought that public dissatisfaction is about more than the economy, that it’s also about our culture, or rather the flat, brute, highly sexualized thing we call our culture.
Now I’d go a step beyond that. I think more and more people are worried about the American
character
—who we are and what kind of adults we are raising.
Every story that has broken through the past few weeks has been about who we are as a people. And they are all disturbing.
********* I know, it's Peggy Noonan, but it is a good read through the end.

 

That was a good article. I think the problem we have is that no one is held accountible for what they do anymore. Or at least most people aren't. There is always an excuse. Most of that is precipitated by our liberal society, but conservatives accomodate it. Conservatives are too afraid of offending people, or being seeing as racist or bigoted. Facts are facts though and when there are clear trends in poor or criminal behavior, they need to be identified so they can be resolved. Until we are ready to do that, we deserve the chaos we are currently observing.

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saveliberty

@Rokke, it's not just liberals. Yes, I live in a blue, blue state, but it is amazing how many women have a fantasy that someone held them back or discriminated against them when they had every opportunity to work hard and prove them wrong if they wanted.

 

People are afraid of excelling, not because of the rewards it can bring, but because of the risks and even hardships that go along with it.

 

I miss grownups.

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@Rokke, it's not just liberals. Yes, I live in a blue, blue state, but it is amazing how many women have a fantasy that someone held them back or discriminated against them when they had every opportunity to work hard and prove them wrong if they wanted.

 

People are afraid of excelling, not because of the rewards it can bring, but because of the risks and even hardships that go along with it.

 

I miss grownups.

 

Great post. Better than Noonan.

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saveliberty

Matt Damon gives Props to George W. Bush?

 

April 20, 2012 By Elizabeth Scalia 1 Comment

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Well that is a surprising headline. Here’s an even more surprising one: Matt Damon wants to kiss George Bush on the mouth:

Matt Damon, known for his liberal politics, gave credit where credit was due to former President George W. Bush.

And he said he’d do it with more than just thanks.

“I would kiss George W. Bush on the mouth for what he did on PEPFAR,” he told The Atlantic
.

From that piece:

MD: I would kiss George W. Bush on the mouth for what he did on PEPFAR.

JG: How long would you kiss him?

MD: Three seconds. No tongue.

You know, PEPFAR is an incredible thing just in terms of how many lives it saved. These ARVs have a Lazarus effect on people. You see a picture of them before and then you see them vibrant, alive, working. Their whole family has been dragged down by the illness and now this. I went on a trip in 2006 (to Africa) and I just had a sense of national pride going around, talking to these people, and they were so happy, they would say, “America,” and I was saying, “Yeah, our president did that, and it’s terrific.” It’s such an obvious connected thing. People aren’t going to hate you when you’re saving their lives.

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Just saw this on a car this morning...

 

Sadly, it's one of the most profound bumper stickers that I've seen lately.

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saveliberty

The George Zimmerman Bail Hearing

 

Scissors-32x32.pngWow - some days chicken salad and some days Florida state prosecutor.

 

George Zimmerman will be released on bail, set at $150,000. The prosecution had asked for $1 million, the defense for $15,000.

 

CNN has 1, 2 transcripts. Here is the CNN live blog and the Guardian live blog.

This was a ghastly opening day for Assistant State Attorney Bernie de la Rionda, who seemed unprepared and admitted as much:

"Mr. Gilbreath, I didn't know we were going to be trying the case, I'm going to add up -- I apologize."

 

***********

 

H/T Instapundit

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WestVirginiaRebel

Jon Corzine Still Bundling for Obama

"MF Global and its brokerage sought Chapter 11 bankruptcy after a $6.3 billion bet on the bonds of some of Europe’s most indebted nations prompted regulator concerns and a credit rating downgrade. Corzine quit MF Global Nov. 4," Bloomberg reported.

 

As ABC reported, "President Obama once hailed [Corzine] as an 'honorable man' and one of his 'best partners' in the White House." Since that time, Obama has tried to distance himself from Corzine, who at one point was considered for the treasury secretary slot.

 

But apparently Obama is still willing to use campaign funds from the embattled Corzine.

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WestVirginiaRebel

Talking pineapple question on state exam stumps ... everyone!

In the story, a take-off on Aesop’s fable about the tortoise and the hare, a talking pineapple challenges a hare to a race. The other animals wager on the immobile pineapple winning — and ponder whether it’s tricking them.

 

When the pineapple fails to move and the rabbit wins, the animals dine on the pineapple.

 

Students were asked two perplexing questions: why did the animals eat the talking fruit, and which animal was wisest?

 

Teachers, principals and parents contacted by The News said they weren’t sure what the answers were.

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