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Confederate forces evacuated Savannah, GA as Union Gen. William T. Sherman continued his "March to the Sea."


Valin

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Civil War Daily Gazette

 

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December 20, 1864 (Tuesday),

Several days ago, William Tecumseh Sherman had demanded the surrender of Savannah along with its garrison. There was no hope in fending off the Union host now nearly surrounding the city, but William Hardee, commanding the Rebel forces within, refused, hoping to buy himself a few days reprieve to come up with a plan of evacuation.

 

This he did on the 19th, and on this date, it was enacted. Beginning with the dawn, a string of wagons crossed a floating bridge recently laid across the Savannah River, along the causeway north into South Carolina – their only route of escape.

The garrison troops from all of the outlying forts had been brought into the city the night before, leaving behind skeleton crews to spike the heavy artillery and dump whatever ammunition could not be carried with them. Nothing was to be set on fire or detonated as that would tip their hand to the Federals. The last thing they wanted to deal with was an assault, which would certainly come if an escape was detected.

Savannah’s evacuation did not go wholly unseen. From the Union line north of the city, the line of wagons were espied, but what it meant was not perfectly understood. Additionally, deserters from Hardee’s forces spread word, but even they were not sure if it was a surrender or evacuation. As for Sherman, he spent most of the day on Hilton Head Island, meeting with the Navy, and away from his command, so even if the evacuation was fully realized, there was little anyone could do about it.

 

(Snip)

 

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BEAUREGARD AND HARDEE PREPARE TO LEAVE SAVANNAH; LEE REFUSES TO HELP

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December 18, 1864 (Sunday)

 

William Hardee, commanding the Confederate troops in Savannah, was buying time. Knowing he could not possibly withstand the onslaught of Sherman’s army, he had nevertheless refused to surrender the city. And still, while he remained in Savannah, there was still some small hope that she might be saved. But saving a city at all costs, regardless of the number of men lost, was no longer the Southern policy of war.

“It is hoped Savannah may be successfully defended,” wrote Inspector-General Samuel Cooper from Richmond. “But the defense should not be too protracted, to the sacrifice of the garrison. The same remarks are applicable to Charleston.”

Cooper was writing to General P.G.T. Beauregard, Hardee’s superior, who was now himself back in Savannah. Fearing that Richmond would continue with the absurd policy of holding ground rather than saving lives, he was relieved to see the change of heart. And so rather than pretending they could do more with less, he began to oversee the plan for evacuating Savannah.

  :snip: 

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  • 4 weeks later...

JOHNSON OFFERS AMNESTY TO ALL PERSONS….

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May 29, 1865

On this date, President Andrew Johnson issued his proclamation of amnesty to (almost) all who participated in the Rebellion against the United States. There were, of course, some notable exceptions….

Andrew Johnson Andrew Johnson

Whereas the President of the United States, on the 8th day of December, A.D. eighteen hundred and sixty-three, and on the 26 day of March, A.D. eighteen hundred and sixty-four, did, with the object to suppress the existing rebellion, to induce all persons to return to their loyalty, and to restore the authority of the United States, issue proclamations offering amnesty and pardon to certain persons who had directly or by implication participated in the said rebellion; and whereas many persons who had so engaged in said rebellion have, since the issuance of said proclamations, failed or neglected to take the benefits offered thereby; and whereas many persons who have been justly deprived of all claim to amnesty and pardon thereunder, by reason of their participation directly or by implication in said rebellion, and continued hostility to the government of the United States since the date of said proclamation, now desire to apply for and obtain amnesty and pardon:  :snip:   http://civilwardailygazette.com/johnson-offers-amnesty-to-all-persons/

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  • 2 years later...
Draggingtree
On 12/20/2017 at 7:31 AM, Valin said:

Civil War Daily Gazette

 

dec20evacf.jpg

 

December 20, 1864 (Tuesday),

Several days ago, William Tecumseh Sherman had demanded the surrender of Savannah along with its garrison. There was no hope in fending off the Union host now nearly surrounding the city, but William Hardee, commanding the Rebel forces within, refused, hoping to buy himself a few days reprieve to come up with a plan of evacuation.

 

This he did on the 19th, and on this date, it was enacted. Beginning with the dawn, a string of wagons crossed a floating bridge recently laid across the Savannah River, along the causeway north into South Carolina – their only route of escape.

The garrison troops from all of the outlying forts had been brought into the city the night before, leaving behind skeleton crews to spike the heavy artillery and dump whatever ammunition could not be carried with them. Nothing was to be set on fire or detonated as that would tip their hand to the Federals. The last thing they wanted to deal with was an assault, which would certainly come if an escape was detected.

Savannah’s evacuation did not go wholly unseen. From the Union line north of the city, the line of wagons were espied, but what it meant was not perfectly understood. Additionally, deserters from Hardee’s forces spread word, but even they were not sure if it was a surrender or evacuation. As for Sherman, he spent most of the day on Hilton Head Island, meeting with the Navy, and away from his command, so even if the evacuation was fully realized, there was little anyone could do about it.

 

(Snip)

American Thinker, by Andrea Widburg Original Article
Posted by Maryland_Patriot  6/18/2020 10:02:57 AM Post Reply
In 1864, Atlanta burned to the ground when General Sherman conducted his famous March through Georgia. Atlanta citizens had better hope that history does not repeat itself, this time because Atlanta police officers are so horrified by the eleven charges the Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard filed against Garret Rolfe, who shot Rayshard Brooks, they’re engaging in a sick out. Without the police, the whole of Atlanta is a sitting duck for every criminal out there. So here’s what we know: Despite the media’s usual claim that a man who died while fighting the police was a beloved family man, Rayshard Brooks might not have been such a nice person. 

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:lmfao: Love It!!!

 

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