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America’s Third Largest Teachers’ Union Heads for the Largest Decertification Vote in History


Geee

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RedState

Despite months of feverish recruiting and manipulation of its numbers, United Teachers of Dade (UTD) came up short in its attempt to bring its membership up to the threshold necessary to avoid a recertification election required under terms of a new law passed by Florida’s legislature this past summer. 

On Dec. 19, UTD President Karla Hernandez-Mats confirmed the union hadn’t been able to persuade 60 percent of the 30,000 teachers it officially represents to become dues-paying members.  

A few days earlier, she claimed the union had increased its numbers to just more than 58 percent, including 800 new members. What she didn’t explain was that the union had to kick out all the substitute teachers from the bargaining district in order to increase their membership percentage, and still fell short.  

Hernandez-Mats declined to disclose the final tally. 

The 60 percent requirement was imposed under Senate Bill 256, the most aggressive state labor reform bill since Wisconsin’s Act 10 under then-Gov. Scott Walker. SB 256 also prohibits public agencies like school districts from deducting dues directly from employees’ paychecks on behalf of the union representing their bargaining unit. 

Critics say the legislation was simply a way to silence unions, but advocates insist that if a union hasn’t won the loyalty of at least 60 percent of those it purports to speak for, allowing its members to weigh in on its usefulness isn’t an unreasonable demand. 

The Freedom Foundation worked closely with the Florida legislature to enact the new law, and soon after, a group of Miami teachers approached the organization for help in establishing an independent, apolitical, local-only alternative that keeps their dues in their district. :snip:

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6 minutes ago, Geee said:
RedState

On Dec. 19, UTD President Karla Hernandez-Mats confirmed the union hadn’t been able to persuade 60 percent of the 30,000 teachers it officially represents to become dues-paying members. 

Obviously these members did not think it was worth it, to give some of their money to someone else.

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1 minute ago, Valin said:

Obviously these members did not think it was worth it, to give some of their money to someone else.

The first year of Scott Walkers governorship they passed a law where teachers could opt out of the union. Unions went by the wayside pretty quickly. Each individual school district was able to negotiate their own health care contracts among other things. Saved a bunch of money and improved benefits. Wonder who was benefiting before??? Huh?

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6 hours ago, Geee said:

The first year of Scott Walkers governorship they passed a law where teachers could opt out of the union. Unions went by the wayside pretty quickly. Each individual school district was able to negotiate their own health care contracts among other things. Saved a bunch of money and improved benefits. Wonder who was benefiting before??? Huh?

WOW, That's a Toughie! :rolleyes:

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