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Make American Films Patriotic Again


Geee

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make-american-films-patriotic-again
Law & Liberty

The American film Maverick, the long-anticipated sequel to the 1980s classic Top Gun, is thus far the highest-grossing film of 2022. Maverick sees Tom Cruise’s titular character from the 1980s film reporting for duty yet again to defend the United States and remind the world’s moviegoers why America is a special place. This generally positive and patriotic, if not nationalistic, message propelled people to their local theaters to watch a pro-American epic.

This, during a time when America’s generally Left-leaning elites had convinced themselves (and had done everything in their power to convince us “normies”) that the United States had “moved beyond” the parochialism of petty patriotism.

In that vein, some worried that the new Tom Cruise film was too jingoistic; that it set unrealistic ideals of the US military and reinforced negative stereotypes. Others more realistically predicted that Maverick, while a raucous box office success, was not the start of a new trend of pro-American films coming our way, and instead, recognized that Maverick represented the last gasp of a dying age.

Certainly, Maverick’s themes, characters, and story resonated with viewers in ways that no Marvel superhero film could. The film also did a good job of displaying a multiethnic cast of characters who, unlike how the Left often describes them, are not hateful toward one another or constantly looking for perceived slights from their white and/or heterosexual colleagues. In essence, this over-the-top film gives one of the most accurate and fair portrayals of race relations in a professional setting in years.

Given Maverick’s success at the box office, why aren’t dozens of similar films with the same positive, patriotic themes in the pipeline today? Why is it that, at least according to filmmakers, Americans must constantly feel shame and sadness about their country and the values it stands for while other nations (save for Russia) are not held to the same exacting, unpatriotic standards?:snip:

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53 minutes ago, Geee said:
make-american-films-patriotic-again
Law & Liberty

 

Given Maverick’s success at the box office, why aren’t dozens of similar films with the same positive, patriotic themes in the pipeline today? Why is it that, at least according to filmmakers, Americans must constantly feel shame and sadness about their country and the values it stands for while other nations (save for Russia) are not held to the same exacting, unpatriotic standards?:snip:

The reason IMO is simple, They The Suit who decide what movies to make have 1. lost touch with Flyover land (1970's?), 2. If you are a writer your screen play  won't get made, if you are a director you won't get  a big buget  or an A list Star. The Message was soon received.   3.. American movies have gone Global (Top Gun: Maverick’s Taiwanese flag patch signals a shift in Hollywood away from placating the Chinese censors in return for financing and distribution. With a population of 1.4 billion, China represents the second-biggest box office on Earth.  Screen Rant).

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I don't know about  Pro-American or Patriotic. I'll settle for entertainment that doesn't always  make me out to be The Bad Guy.

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China’s growing number of “patriotic” films reflect a newfound sense of cultural confidence—arrogance—of the kind that Lee and others feared was arising in China over a decade ago. Interestingly, with the rare exception of Maverick, most American films today are not only devoid of any semblance of patriotism, but they’re downright hostile to the very notion of pride in ourselves.

OTOH (I'd say starting in the late 60's) Our (The West) elite have lost confidence in our culture.

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