Jump to content

Three cases to watch as Supreme Court readies for final oral arguments of term


Geee

Recommended Posts

3270194-three-cases-to-watch-as-supreme-court-readies-for-final-oral-arguments-of-term
The Hill

The Supreme Court this month will hear its last oral arguments in a term that has been overshadowed by disputes over abortion and the Second Amendment and the confirmation of the nation’s first Black female justice.

As the country awaits decisions in those potentially landmark cases, three cases stand out as highlights among the remaining disputes to be argued before the justices. 

They involve a Trump-era immigration policy, a dispute over a high school football coach’s religious practice on school grounds and the Miranda warning that suspects are given by law enforcement. 

It’s the last set of arguments that will include Justice Stephen Breyer, who will retire this summer. He will be replaced by the newly confirmed Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson.

Trump-era ‘remain in Mexico’ policy

One of the most high-profile fights on the court’s docket is a dispute over the Biden administration’s effort to end a controversial Trump-era immigration measure that requires asylum-seekers at the southern border to stay in Mexico while their applications are processed.

Arguments will center on whether the Biden administration must continue the policy despite the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) conclusion that the measure is not in the United States’ national interest. :snip:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Geee said:
3270194-three-cases-to-watch-as-supreme-court-readies-for-final-oral-arguments-of-term
The Hill

The Supreme Court this month will hear its last oral arguments in a term that has been overshadowed by disputes over abortion and the Second Amendment and the confirmation of the nation’s first Black female justice.

As the country awaits decisions in those potentially landmark cases, three cases stand out as highlights among the remaining disputes to be argued before the justices. 

They involve a Trump-era immigration policy, a dispute over a high school football coach’s religious practice on school grounds and the Miranda warning that suspects are given by law enforcement. 

It’s the last set of arguments that will include Justice Stephen Breyer, who will retire this summer. He will be replaced by the newly confirmed Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson.

Trump-era ‘remain in Mexico’ policy

One of the most high-profile fights on the court’s docket is a dispute over the Biden administration’s effort to end a controversial Trump-era immigration measure that requires asylum-seekers at the southern border to stay in Mexico while their applications are processed.

Arguments will center on whether the Biden administration must continue the policy despite the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) conclusion that the measure is not in the United States’ national interest. :snip:

Miranda rights

The justices this week will hear a procedural dispute that stems from a police officer’s failure to issue a Miranda warning in a case with potentially weighty criminal justice implications.

The case arose after Terence Tekoh, a Los Angeles hospital worker, was accused of sexually assaulting a patient. In the course of investigating, Los Angeles County Deputy Sheriff Carlos Vega brought Tekoh to a private room to talk but did not advise Tekoh of his Miranda rights, which include a notice of the right against self-incrimination while in police custody.

(Snip)

------------------------------------

No Brainer comes to mind.

____________________________________________________

Prayer in school athletics

 

A third upcoming case pits a high school football coach against school administrators who reprimanded the coach over his practice of holding a brief prayer on the field’s 50-yard line following games.

A devout Christian, coach Joseph Kennedy’s custom of kneeling on field and conducting prayer while surrounded by many of his players drew reproach from officials at his Seattle-area public school. Administrators told Kennedy his conduct violated a school policy that prohibited staff from encouraging students to engage in prayer or other devotional activity.

(Snip)

------------------------------------------------

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof;

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, Valin said:

Prayer in school athletics

 

A third upcoming case pits a high school football coach against school administrators who reprimanded the coach over his practice of holding a brief prayer on the field’s 50-yard line following games.

A devout Christian, coach Joseph Kennedy’s custom of kneeling on field and conducting prayer while surrounded by many of his players drew reproach from officials at his Seattle-area public school. Administrators told Kennedy his conduct violated a school policy that prohibited staff from encouraging students to engage in prayer or other devotional activity.

(Snip)

------------------------------------------------

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof;

 

Apr. 16 2022

Coach Joe Kennedy has had a heck of a life. From the start, all the odds were against him. His adopted parents abandoned him when he was a boy, and he had to fend for himself. After high school, he joined the military, and for his 20-year career in the Marine Corps he was practically an atheist. Then he returned home and became a high school football coach, and everything changed. He became a believer. One night, he put on a movie, "Facing the Giants," which includes a coach who prays on the 50-yard line. He made a covenant with God to pray after every game. It cost him his job. Now, he’s facing the Supreme Court to defend his right to quietly pray in public after football games. He just wants his job back and his faith protected. But the outcome of the case will affect the First Amendment rights of teachers and coaches all across America, and it will answer an important question: Is America still a free country?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • 1721709876
×
×
  • Create New...