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Nathan Bedford Forrest: Birthday Post

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Nathan Bedford Forrest: Birthday Post

 
 forrest
 
 
Gen Nathan Bedford Forrest, III 
 
 
 
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US Army Air Corps Brigadier General. He was the first American General Officer killed in combat against the Nazis during World War II. His plane was shot down over the Baltic Sea while participating in a B-17 bomber raid on Kiel, Germany. 

(His family was presented his 
Distinguished Flying Cross, which he was awarded posthumously for staying at the controls of his B-17 bomber while his crew bailed out.[2] The plane exploded before Forrest could bail out. By the time the Seenotdienst (the German air-sea rescue) arrived, only one of the crew was still alive in the water.) 

A 1928 graduate of West Point, he served as Second Air Force Chief of Staff prior to transfer to the U.S. Eighth Air Force in England. His body was recovered and buried by the Germans, after washing up at a seaplane base, in a small cemetery in Wier, Germany. He was the great-grandson of Confederate Lt. General Nathan Bedford Forrest. In 1949, his body was returned from Germany and reburied in Arlington at the request of his wife, Frances Brassler Forrest Martin. 


This essay was published as a new introduction for Lytle’s Bedford Forrest and His Critter Company and is published here in honor of Forrest’s birthday, July 13. :snip: 

https://freenorthcarolina.blogspot.com/2019/07/nathan-bedford-forrest-birthday-post.html

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Dabney’s Warning for the New South

 
Dabney.jpg

Robert Lewis Dabney (1820–1898) defended the South both during and after the War Between the States. During the war, this professor of theology left his work at Union Theological Seminary to serve as chaplain for the Confederacy in 1861 and then as chief of staff to General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson in 1862.

After the war, Dabney made it one of his chief tasks to defend the South politically and morally through his writings. He memorialized one of the greatest men produced by the Old South in his biography of Stonewall Jackson. Dabney’s wife and Jackson’s wife were cousins, and following the death of the great general on May 10, 1863, Mrs. Jackson asked Dabney to write a biography of her late husband. Dabney finished the work in 1866, entitled Life and Campaigns of Lieut. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson
:snip: 
 

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A History Lesson for Ted Cruz

By Samuel W. Mitcham on Jul 15, 2019

I am always annoyed when a conservative political leader attacks Southern heritage. I don’t know why because with the present-day crop of cowardly politicians, it is becoming routine, but I am. Unwittingly or not, these modern day Scalawags adopt the “politically correct” line, even though they know (or should know) that political correctness is nothing more than a euphemism for cultural Marxism.

Recently, the courageous governor of Tennessee, Bill Lee, swam against the politically correct stream, obeyed state law, and issued a proclamation calling for a day of observance in honor of Nathan Bedford Forrest as well as commemorating Confederate Decoration Day and Robert E. Lee Day. Governor Lee also stated that he would not be a party to “whitewashing history” by ripping down the bust of Forrest in the Tennessee State Capitol.

For his refusal to join this intellectual lynch mob, Governor Lee was immediately attacked by the usual anti-Southern bigots and Socialist/Democrat/Leftist house organs, such as the Washington Compost and the New York Slimes.[1] This was predictable. What was unusual and absurd about this particular assault on the memory of a brave man is a tweet by Senator Ted Cruz of Texas, who mounted his rhetorical Mount Siani and declared: “This is wrong!” 

But back to my original question: what do you know about it anyway, Senator Cruz?  :snip: https://www.abbevilleinstitute.org/blog/a-history-lesson-for-ted-cruz/

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