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to those of you with a mac. I have an iMac. Can I download iBooks to it? or is it already there (yes, sorry to say Ms. Caveman here)

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to those of you with a mac. I have an iMac. Can I download iBooks to it? or is it already there (yes, sorry to say Ms. Caveman here)

 

I use books.

A. They always work

B. Battery never run out, no need to recharge

C. No pesky format problems.

 

But I'm a Luddite.

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to those of you with a mac. I have an iMac. Can I download iBooks to it? or is it already there (yes, sorry to say Ms. Caveman here)

 

I use books.

A. They always work

B. Battery never run out, no need to recharge

C. No pesky format problems.

 

But I'm a Luddite.

 

 

books are always my first choice

 

i went to two libraries to reserve the 3 books in the Hunger games series. LONG waits on each. One I was over 100th on list

 

Friend from my brother's church sent me the books via a E profile

 

I installed Reader for Mac on my iMac & I am good to go

 

I would NEVER read on my iPhone & very very rarely on my iPad. but with the computer (24") witht he capacity to enlarge print, it wont be bad.

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Heaven and Hell: a Novel: A Journey of Chris and Serena Davis (Tears of Heaven) Kenneth Zeigler

Description

Heaven and Hell takes you on a journey through Heaven and Hell, as viewed through the eyes of Chris and Serena Davis, who come to experience their reality first hand. Through God s mercy, those who dwell in Heaven, have no recollection of loved ones in Hell. At least, most don t. Yet, in the most beautiful place in the universe, one man s troubling dreams lead him to realize that the love of his earth life has been condemned to Satan s realm. Now, with the help of a famous scientist from the past, Chris endeavors to pull off the ultimate prison break.

About the Author

Kenneth Zeigler was born in 1954, in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He holds a masters degree in chemistry from Shippensburg University, with thesis work in the field of quantum chemistry. He has taught high school and college science and mathematics for thirty years. He is married, and currently lives outside of Phoenix, Arizona.

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Heaven and Hell: a Novel: A Journey of Chris and Serena Davis (Tears of Heaven) Kenneth Zeigler

Description

Heaven and Hell takes you on a journey through Heaven and Hell, as viewed through the eyes of Chris and Serena Davis, who come to experience their reality first hand. Through God s mercy, those who dwell in Heaven, have no recollection of loved ones in Hell. At least, most don t. Yet, in the most beautiful place in the universe, one man s troubling dreams lead him to realize that the love of his earth life has been condemned to Satan s realm. Now, with the help of a famous scientist from the past, Chris endeavors to pull off the ultimate prison break.

About the Author

Kenneth Zeigler was born in 1954, in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He holds a masters degree in chemistry from Shippensburg University, with thesis work in the field of quantum chemistry. He has taught high school and college science and mathematics for thirty years. He is married, and currently lives outside of Phoenix, Arizona.

 

 

Well that sounds like an interesting concept.

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Has anybody read Unbroken? I just started it yesterday -- I know a good portion is going to be hard for me to read but our couples book group is discussing it at the end of the month.

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Has anybody read Unbroken? I just started it yesterday -- I know a good portion is going to be hard for me to read but our couples book group is discussing it at the end of the month.

 

 

Reading it now...really good!

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_rHWZQdjfHQ

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I will have to read Unbroken

I absolutely loved reading Same Kind of Different as Me by Ron Hall and Denver Moore. Maybe its because we lived in Ft. Worth for 5 years and knew the places and maybe because the church mentioned was ours for a while and we understand the dynamics and maybe its because I am a Christian but this book moved me more than anything I have read in probably 20 years. Do your real "you", your spirit, a favor and read it.

 

"It begins outside a burning plantation hut in Louisiana... and an East Texas honky-tonk... and, without a doubt, in the heart of God. It unfolds in a

Hollywood hacienda... an upscale New York Gallery... a downtown

dumpster... a Texas ranch.

Gritty with pain and betrayal and brutality, it also shines with an

unexpected, life-changing love."

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to those of you with a mac. I have an iMac. Can I download iBooks to it? or is it already there (yes, sorry to say Ms. Caveman here)

 

I use books.

A. They always work

B. Battery never run out, no need to recharge

C. No pesky format problems.

 

But I'm a Luddite.

 

 

books are always my first choice

 

i went to two libraries to reserve the 3 books in the Hunger games series. LONG waits on each. One I was over 100th on list

 

Friend from my brother's church sent me the books via a E profile

 

I installed Reader for Mac on my iMac & I am good to go

 

I would NEVER read on my iPhone & very very rarely on my iPad. but with the computer (24") witht he capacity to enlarge print, it wont be bad.

 

Edited because I screwed it up:

 

 

 

shoutGhost. I am on the third and last in the series Hunger Games. This last one is the fourth book I have read with the Kindle I got for Christmas. I am getting used to it. The first two books were very good and made the time on the recumbent bike go very fast :)

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Has anybody read Unbroken? I just started it yesterday -- I know a good portion is going to be hard for me to read but our couples book group is discussing it at the end of the month.

 

 

Just posted about this on my Facebook writers/readers thread. Just picked up at library & went to Farinaccis.. wine & pizza & read first couple chapters. Did not realize it was non fiction & the hero was born the same year as my dad.

 

Looks like a good book & all the raves.

 

If you haven't stopped by the group at FB (find it at my page) there has been quite a bit of activity

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Taft 2012: A Novel

Heller, Jason

Reviewed by Michael Pucci

Released: January 17, 2012

 

“As a fairy tale, Taft 2012: A Novel is a welcome tonic to the bottomless cynicism that can consume our politics. If you’re after something more biting, all you need is your remote control.”

 

Our political system is a theater of the absurd. Would anyone disagree?

 

As we brace ourselves for the 2011–2012 yearlong election season, political humorists can rest assured there will be no shortage of material keeping them engaged and employed. But they must be careful not to settle for easy parody when their targets often do such a good job of parodying themselves.

 

(Snip)

 

These days, a satirist has to raise his game in a big way to make a point, and it doesn’t come much bigger than the subject of Jason Heller’s winsome novel Taft 2012. In the book, William Howard Taft, our 27th president, vanishes inexplicably on the day of his successor’s inauguration in 1913 and reappears just as inexplicably on the White House lawn in 2011.

 

After a skeptical nation is given proof that the robust man not seen in nearly a century is the former president, Taft is soon held up as a paragon of old-fashioned values and a newly-formed political party urges him to run in the 2012 presidential election.

 

This premise allows Mr. Heller to indulge in some whimsical—if obvious—fun, as Taft adjusts to a world that has advanced in unthinkable ways (“. . . the intrepid chefs had persevered by consulting an unseen scholar the agent had called Goggle or Google or something to that effect. God bless this encyclopedic Mr. Google, whoever he was.”). He speaks loquaciously to a society more accustomed to text messages and thinks tipping a quarter for a meal is “too kind.”

 

Helping Taft acclimate to his new surroundings are three people: Susan Weschler, a historian whose specialty is the Taft presidency; Ira Kowalczyk, a Secret Service agent assigned to protect Taft after first shooting him on the White House grounds; and most importantly, Rachel Taft, the president’s great-granddaughter who serves as an independent congresswoman in Ohio.

 

(Snip)

 

So when Taft tells his followers in an impassioned call to arms, “The true work of good, honest government is more important than any one presidential campaign, than any one old politician . . . more important . . . than the name Taft itself,” it gives away Taft 2012 for what it really is: a fairy tale.

 

That might sound harsh, but it’s not meant to be. By choosing as his subject a U.S. president that nobody knows much about (besides his girth), Mr. Heller is able to impart on him a purity much like we’ve assigned to the Founding Fathers: figures from our mythologized past that remind us of how much progress we’ve made and what we can yet accomplish.

 

As a fairy tale, Taft 2012: A Novel is a welcome tonic to the bottomless cynicism that can consume our politics. If you’re after something more biting, all you need is your remote control.

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Recent reads and opinion:

 

Red Mist, Patricia Cornwall

Author may be getting tired. Her earlier works are much better written. This book seemed to have a lot of tiresome dialog and story line.

 

Believing the Lie, Elizabeth George

Elizabeth George is an excellent writer, and this recent book shows it. While the author was undergoing major life changes, a couple of her later books did not measure up to previous works. This book gets back to proving that she is not just a mystery writer, but a skilled crafter of language and plot. Every novel is a deep exploration of human nature, disguised as a mystery novel. Highly recommend this book and author.

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I just finished Red Mist wasn't near as good a earlier books, and he extreme liberalism shows through. Am on the list for the Elizabeth George book at library

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We gave up on Cornwell a few years ago. Loved her Scarpetta series for a long time but finally got tired of her pushing the lesbian sympathy agenda and her portrayals of "evangelical Christians"as always bigoted. mean, ignorant and/or judgmental.

Not to mention her wriitng (another series entirely) is sometimes so - well just plain- trite and bad.

 

Kathy Reichs is another one whom we used to eagerly await but who has disappointed us with her views (Christians, environment, New Age causes, politics etc etc) in the last few books in her series

 

I LOVE Elizabeth George. Though I have to say I was thoroughly depressed by her What Came Before He shot Her

Her books are definitely more psychological novel than just the English genre of mystery. Good writer as ciapilot said.

 

Btw another good writer of the psychological mystery style is Ruth Rendall.

 

 

I also love Martha Grimes. Especially her Inspector Jury series.

You have to start at the beginning and get to know the on going characters.

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Has anybody read Unbroken? I just started it yesterday -- I know a good portion is going to be hard for me to read but our couples book group is discussing it at the end of the month.

 

 

Reading it now...really good!

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_rHWZQdjfHQ

 

Finished reading Unbroken today. It is as excellent as everyone says. It is much more of an inspiration than it is a harrowing story that is difficult to read. Laura Hillebrand does a good job of telling the prison camp part of the story without dwelling on every detail. She is a very good writer. Our couples' book club is tomorrow night. Should be interesting.

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@nickydog

 

I had a brother in law who was a Seabee in WWII, he really hated the Japanese. I bought a Sabaru, not only would he not let me park it in his driveway, I had to park it down the block so he wouldn't see it. The war in the Pacific really was different than Europe.

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City Journal

 

Kay S. Hymowitz

White Blight

Charles Murray depicts an increasingly two-tiered white America.

25 January 2012

 

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Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960–2010, by Charles Murray (Crown Forum, 416 pp., $27)

Charles Murray is back, and the debate about wealth and inequality will never be the same. Readers of the political scientist’s earlier work, especially The Bell Curve and Losing Ground, might assume that with his new book he is returning to the vexed subject of race. He is, but with a twist: Murray’s area of intensive focus (and data mining) is “the state of white America”—and it’s not what you might think.

 

According to Murray, the last 50 years have seen the emergence of a “new upper class.” By this he means something quite different from the 1 percent that makes the Occupy Wall Streeters shake their pitchforks. He refers, rather, to the cognitive elite that he and his coauthor Richard Herrnstein warned about in The Bell Curve. This elite is blessed with diplomas from top colleges and with jobs that allow them to afford homes in Nassau County, New York and Fairfax County, Virginia. They’ve earned these things not through trust funds, Murray explains, but because of the high IQs that the postindustrial economy so richly rewards.

 

Murray creates a fictional town, Belmont, to illustrate the demographics and culture of the new upper class. Belmont looks nothing like the well-heeled but corrupt, godless enclave of the populist imagination. On the contrary: the top 20 percent of citizens in income and education exemplify the core founding virtues Murray defines as industriousness, honesty, marriage, and religious observance. Yes, the elites rebelled against bourgeois America in the late 1960s and 1970s, but it wasn’t long before they put away their counterculture garb. Today, they work long hours and raise their doted-upon offspring in stable homes. One of the most ignored facts about American social life is that the divorce rate among the college-educated has been declining since the early 1980s, while their illegitimate children (as they used to be called) remain as rare as pickup trucks in their garages. Murray deems some of the Belmontians’ financial excesses “unseemly,” but for the most part, he finds them law-abiding and civically engaged—taking their children to church or synagogue, organizing petitions for new stoplights or parks, running Little League teams and PTA fundraisers.

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Just finished Being George Washington by Glenn Beck.

 

A very good read. No rantings. Just a good book about a great man.

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Just finished reading Greider's "Who Will Tell The People". I usually don't care for political tomes during election season, but this book is the exception. Written in the early 90s by the same author who gave us "Secrets of the Temple", Greider presents a solid and fact-filled case for the fact that, "it is well known that the American people cannot stand their congress person. What is little known, but no less true is that the American congress can't stand the American people."

Once it begins, it's hard to put down. And it is as frighteningly relevent today as it was the day the ink first dried.

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And I just finished reading The Last American Man, about a guy named Eustace Conway, the saddest, most damaged, frustrated, accomplished, interesting, smart, impossible man in this country probably. Has anyone else read it?

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OK....it's been awhile....now I've just finished reading Dicken's "Bleak House"...great yarn. That guy could tell a heck of a story!

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