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59 minutes of the rewriting history of the Alamo


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Draggingtree

Forget the Alamo

The Battle of the Alamo has been mythologized according to a new book by author Bryan Burrough, columnist Chris Tomlinson, and political consultant Jason Stanford. Past accounts omitted the participation of Texans of Mexican descent and the role that slavery factored into the conflict according to the authors. This was a virtual event hosted by BookPeople Bookstore in Austin, Texas. close 

https://www.c-span.org/video/?513252-1/forget-alamo#

 

 

 

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  • Draggingtree changed the title to 59 minutes of the rewriting history of the Alamo

@Draggingtree

If you have never read anything about the Alamo you might not know Texans of Mexican descent were part of the defense of the Alamo, or were a large part of that revolution. I remember being taught in the 6th grade about the Texas war of independence...Oh and they did mention Mexicans taking part. Reason being Mexico City treated them sort of like DC treats...Idaho...South Dakota...Mississippi.

 

PS There was Slavery In Texas! :blink:

Edited by Valin
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Draggingtree
On 8/1/2021 at 12:46 PM, Valin said:

@Draggingtree

If you have never read anything about the Alamo you might not know Texans of Mexican descent were part of the defense of the Alamo, or were a large part of that revolution. I remember being taught in the 6th grade about the Texas war of independence...Oh and they did mention Mexicans taking part. Reason being Mexico City treated them sort of like DC treats...Idaho...South Dakota...Mississippi.

 

PS There was Slavery In Texas! :blink:

sounds like you didn't read the post 

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6 hours ago, Draggingtree said:

sounds like you didn't read the post 

You are correct, I didn't.

This however is what I was referring to.

The Alamo Deserves So Much Better Than San Antonio's Treatment of It

Bryan Preston

Jul 31, 2021

I’ve been around the Alamo occupationally and through advocacy for six or so years now. It’s by far the most contested patch of ground in Texas, if not the United States. I’m not the first to observe that too many people really enjoy fighting about the Alamo, but too few spend much time or energy fighting for the Alamo.

The difference between the two is vast.

Fighting for the Alamo means exactly that: preserving the structures that still exist, researching the history, telling its story accurately through means as varied as a museum, reconstruction, and living history, and making sure its story is remembered.

Fighting about the Alamo is about none of that. It’s about personal and group political agendas that often build their power at the Alamo’s expense, without any evident regard for the consequences to the Alamo. Such fighting has already broken one Alamo preservation project and it’s threatening the current one.

As former Alamo CEO Doug McDonald wrote this past week, fighting for the Alamo should be the priority, especially in the Alamo City — San Antonio, Texas. But it isn’t.

(Snip)

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