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Rush Limbaugh passes away


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Rush’s Absence Can Make The Right Grow Stronger

Rush Limbaugh, who passed away on Wednesday, entered the national political landscape at a time, three decades ago, when his singular talents were sorely needed in America – after the exit of Ronald Reagan, and as liberals were gleefully proclaiming that the end of the Cold War had left conservatives high, dry and irrelevant. Spending the massive “Peace Dividend” was the new challenge, as Washington contemplated the “End of History.”

But Rush may now have just departed at the perfect time too – after the exit of Donald Trump, when the left is defining the Republican Party as lost and gradually disintegrating, its leaders and voters irreparably split between Trumpers and Never Trumpers.

 

The truth is that both El Rushbo and the Donald were, like Reagan, great communicators. And what all three communicated were roughly the same set of principles.

Only on Monday, the Wall Street Journal’s Bill McGurn put it succinctly: “If we stick with the policies that made Donald Trump successful – deregulation, cutting taxes, moving the [U.S.] embassy [to Jerusalem] – those are standard conservative principles. He sold them in a unique way, but if the party stays with that it’s not a break with Trump and it’s not a break with its past.”:snip:

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Rush Limbaugh: Death Of A Giant

Though widely anticipated, the death of Rush Limbaugh after a long battle with cancer is a major blow to conservatives. His witty, often acerbic commentary had been a daily anchor to reality for many Americans, tired of the mainstream media’s lies, bias and prevarications. But with his death, Limbaugh leaves a hole in the conservative movement that is impossible to fill.

The center-right media firmament has many bright stars. Unfortunately, none shine as brightly as Rush did. As the numerous accounts of his death and life point out, he was the most listened to radio show host in history.

 

He was a master of the medium, and used his three-hour daily radio platform both wisely and well. With 20 million listeners at his peak, Limbaugh singlehandedly turned more liberals and moderates into conservatives than perhaps anyone outside of Ronald Reagan. He was a cultural phenomenon.

That gave him unprecedented political clout for a radio personality. Frankly, we’re not sure who picks up the torch from here. Dennis Prager? Ben Shapiro? Mark Levin? Laura Ingraham? Dan Bongino? Sean Hannity? Andrew Klavan? John Batchelor? Michael Knowles? There are many possible candidates, each excellent and brilliant in his or her own way.

But none is likely to ever match Limbaugh’s raw muscle, reach and influence.:snip:

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Rush’s Monument Let us all speak, and fearlessly. - Andrew Klavan

 

I only spoke to Rush Limbaugh once. He interviewed me for his magazine. He was—as anyone who knew him will tell you—quiet, intelligent, self-effacing. I think back now on our long phone conversation, and I’m glad I got to tell him this story.

My father was a famous disc jockey in New York. He was good, very good, as good as any broadcaster I’ve ever heard. He was a liberal—of the old style, back when liberals were liberal, not like now. But oh, he hated Rush. Hated everything Rush stood for. To him, Rush was Father Coughlin reborn. A demagogue. One step away from Hitler. All conservatives were one step away from Hitler as far as my father was concerned.

One day, as we were chatting about the radio business, he unleashed on Limbaugh big time. Rush was not just evil himself, he was the cause of evil in others, an omen of American fascism, a harbinger of the collapse of everything true and beautiful.

I listened to him all the way through. Then I said quietly, “Maybe. But he’s the best man with a microphone since you.”

My father’s shoulders sagged. “I know,” he said.:snip:

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Simply the best: Why Rush Limbaugh was the GOAT of talk radio - Joe Concha

:snip: 

 

This past Christmas, during his final show of 2020, Limbaugh said:

 

“My point in everything today that I’m sharing with you about this is to say thanks and to tell everybody involved how much I love you from the bottom of a sizable and growing and still beating heart, and there’s room for much more," he told listeners. "All because I have learned what love really is during this. You know, I have a philosophy there’s good that happens in everything,” he said. “It may not reveal itself immediately, and even in the most dire circumstances, if you just wait, if you just remain open to things, the good in it will reveal itself. And that has happened to me as well in countless, countless ways.”

Rest in peace, Rush Limbaugh. You will be missed. But you won't be replaced. :snip:

  

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A word from Rush

Scott Johnson

Feb. 18 2021

(Snip)

In his brief response one can see facets of his character including his humility, his kindness, his generosity, his encouragement, his enthusiasm — all put on display at the moment he had been given his death sentence:

Quote

Scott! I know who you are!! You are huge, a giant in the movement and blogosphere…all of you at Power Line are inspiring and always supportive…you always seem to understand when others don’t “get it.” It’s greatly appreciated.

When word came of Rush’s death yesterday, I thought of Boswell’s assessment of Samuel Johnson in the concluding words of Boswell’s Life of Johnson: “He has made a chasm, which not only nothing can fill up, but which nothing has a tendency to fill up. Johnson is dead. Let us go to the next best. There is nobody. No man can be said to put you in the mind of Johnson.”

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The worst people in the world? Those gleefully celebrating the death of Rush Limbaugh

“You are a little man.  It’s not that you’re short. You’re little, in the mind and in the heart. Tonight you tried to make a man little whose boots you couldn’t touch if you stood on tiptoe on top of the highest mountain in the world. And as it turned out…you ever littler than you were before.”  People Will Talk, 1951:snip:

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Rush Limbaugh - and the Importance of Being Hated - James O'Keefe 

It is with great sadness that I learned my dear friend, inspirational figure, and American radio icon Rush Limbaugh has passed away.

I will never forget what Rush said when someone once asked him about how he handled being hated:

There's a good reason for the media hating me.  And once I came to grips with that fact, that there's a reason they should hate me, then it makes sense.  One of the toughest things I had to do was learn to psychologically accept the fact that being hated was a sign of success.  Most people aren't raised to be hated.  We're all raised to be loved.  We want to be loved.  We're told to do things to be loved and appreciated and liked.  We're raised, don't offend anybody, be nice.  Everybody wants total acceptance. Everybody wants respect. Everybody wants to be loved, and so when you learn that what you do is going to engender hatred you have to learn to accept that as a sign of success.  That was a tough psychological thing for me.:snip:

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James ‘Bo Snerdley’ Golden Delivers Emotional Tribute To Rush Limbaugh

 

:snip:“And beyond all of those accomplishments, Rush Limbaugh was one of the finest human beings that you would ever want to meet,” Golden continued, growing emotional again as he defended his former boss against charges of racism. “A generous, wonderful, beautiful spirit. Humble, a gentleman. Never failed to thank people for the smallest service that they could do to him. He never looked down on people. It burns me to my soul when people sully his reputation with falsehoods, calling him a racist.”:snip:

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2 hours ago, Geee said:

Rush Limbaugh - and the Importance of Being Hated - James O'Keefe 

It is with great sadness that I learned my dear friend, inspirational figure, and American radio icon Rush Limbaugh has passed away.

I will never forget what Rush said when someone once asked him about how he handled being hated:

There's a good reason for the media hating me.  And once I came to grips with that fact, that there's a reason they should hate me, then it makes sense.  One of the toughest things I had to do was learn to psychologically accept the fact that being hated was a sign of success.  Most people aren't raised to be hated.  We're all raised to be loved.  We want to be loved.  We're told to do things to be loved and appreciated and liked.  We're raised, don't offend anybody, be nice.  Everybody wants total acceptance. Everybody wants respect. Everybody wants to be loved, and so when you learn that what you do is going to engender hatred you have to learn to accept that as a sign of success.  That was a tough psychological thing for me.:snip:

 

The secret is to not give A Damn about what The Left says about you.

Actually a 2nd secret. Always triple check what you say/do is *true.

 

* Of course the concept of Truth is not held in high regard by Our Betters.

"There is no Truth.

Is That True?"

Frank Turek

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  • 2 weeks later...
7 hours ago, Geee said:

 

HuffPo

 

Quote

Rush Limbaugh died of lung cancer last month at age 70 following a career as the “bigoted king of talk radio” who “saturated America’s airwaves with cruel bigotries, lies and conspiracy theories for over three decades,” HuffPost reported.

 

Once Again they neglected to mention what the cruel bigotries, lies and conspiracy theories were.

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