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Shiloh Awakening


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Shiloh Awakening

By: David GoldfieldDate:May20 , 2011

Shiloh was a biblical city. Its name means “tranquil.” The Children of Israel gathered there to protect the Ark of the Covenant containing the two stone tablets of the Ten Commandments. The Children, however, slipped in their devotion to God. The Philistines delivered a crushing defeat and carried off the Ark. Eventually, Shiloh was destroyed.

 

Shiloh gave its name to several evangelical Christian churches in America. Congregants hoped to emulate the tranquility and sanctity of the biblical place, while admonishing each other to remain righteous unto the Lord. Such was the hope of Shiloh Chapel in southwest Tennessee. On April 6 and 7, 1862, two American armies fought each other near this church in the bloodiest battle in the nation’s history up to that time. The outcome was indecisive and strategically ambiguous. The victors did not carry any priceless religious artifacts from the field. The church survived. How American soldiers and civilians viewed the civil war in their midst, however, changed for all time. And with that altered vision, the nation changed as well. . . .Scissors-32x32.pnghttp://www.commandposts.com/2011/05/shiloh-awakening/

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At the risk of high jacking a thread.....

Back to the Front
Marine veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars visit an important World War I battle site.
Patrick K. O’Donnell
5/3013

pic_giant_053013_Bealleau-Wood-Tall.jpg
Marine Staff Sergeant Herman A. Lubbe at the Marine Corps monument at Belleau Wood.

At Belleau Wood, just outside Paris, the scars of war are everywhere: shell holes so large they could hold a car, the remains of trenches, pockmarked stone walls and trees that still contain pockets of mustard gas trapped deep in their trunks.
Here, 95 years ago, the U.S. Marines stopped the German army’s last great offensive of World War I.
This week, as an unpaid volunteer historian, I accompanied 20 men and women of the U.S. Marine Corps Wounded Warrior Regiment as they carefully tramped back to the front where their Marine forebears fought nearly a century ago. Later in the week, I will give them a guided tour of Pointe du Hoc and the other crucial beaches and airborne-drop zones of Normandy.

(Snip)

*“I doubt most Americans have ever heard of Belleau,” remarked one young Marine while standing at a bronze plate memorializing the Marines the Germans dubbed “Teufelhunden,” or “devil dogs,” for their intrepid battlefield prowess.
He then went on to ask the group, “Do you think they will ever have any monuments in Iraq or Afghanistan?”
“No,” the group universally responded, as some leaned forward on their canes.


At Lucy-le-Bocage, one of the villages at the epicenter of the fighting at Belleau Wood, an elderly French woman came up to the Marines and said, “We do not forget what you have done for us in World War I and World War II. Vive les Américains.”

(Snip)


* And Don't get me started on that subject....unless you want a 12 page highly colorful rant. angry.png

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