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Tear gas fired in Hong Kong with no end in sight to protests

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CTV

Alice Fung and Yanan Wang, The Associated Press
Sunday, August 11, 2019

HONG KONG -- Police fired tear gas late Sunday afternoon to try to disperse a demonstration in Hong Kong as protesters took over streets in two parts of the Asian financial capital, blocking traffic and setting up another night of likely showdowns with riot police.

Protesters hurled bricks at officers and ignored warnings to leave the Sham Shui Po area before tear gas was deployed, police said, calling the march an "unauthorized assembly." Nearby, protesters wearing gas masks gathered outside a police station in Cheung Sha Wan, as officers wearing their own protective gear looked down at them from a tall wall around the station.

Across Victoria Harbour, a large group of mostly young protesters marched down the middle of Hennessey Road, a main shopping drag in the Causeway Bay area, as a rally was held in nearby Victoria Park. Many wore face masks to shield their identities, and a few had helmets. Others just carried backpacks over the black T-shirts that have become their uniform.

"We hope the world knows that Hong Kong is not the Hong Kong it used to be," said one protester, Louisa Ho. "China is doing more and more to pressure Hong Kong, its people and its organizations."

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Hong Kong airport suspends check-ins due to pro-democracy protest

Aug. 12 2019

Hong Kong airport on Monday suspended check-ins for all remaining flights due to pro-democracy protests taking place inside arrival terminals, according to reports.

The protests have been ongoing for four days at the terminal and have been shouting, “No rioters, only tyranny,” Reuters reported.

Hong Kong International Airport said in a statement that the demonstration "seriously disrupted" airport operations. It said all check-in services for departing flights had been suspended. It said only those flights that have already completed the check-in process will move ahead.

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Hong Kong Cancels All Remaining Monday Flights as Protests Swarm Airport

Venus Feng and Sheryl Tian Tong Lee

August 12, 2019

Hong Kong airport authorities canceled remaining flights on Monday after protesters swarmed the main terminal building for a fourth day, the biggest disruption yet to the city’s economy since demonstrations began in early June.

Thousands of black-clad protesters on Monday packed the arrival area, where they had gathered for a three-day sit-in that was originally planned to end last night. The protests, initially sparked by opposition to a bill that would allow extraditions to mainland China, have become increasingly violent in recent weeks, with demonstrators targeting public transportation in a bid to pressure the government

It was unclear how many flights were impacted, according to Doris Lai, a spokesperson for the Hong Kong Airport Authority. The airport said in an earlier statement that it was aiming to restore operations as soon as possible after canceling all flights for the rest of the day, except those already in the air.

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Protesters send Hong Kong airport into chaos for a second day cancelling flights

Ken Martin 

August 13, 2019

All flights were cancelled at Hong Kong's airport for a second day after protesters took over the terminals. The airport authority announced early Tuesday evening that check-in services for departing flights were suspended. It said it did not expect arriving flights to be affected, though dozens of arriving flights were already cancelled. The authority advised the public not to come to the airport.

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The central government in Beijing ominously characterized the protest movement as something approaching "terrorism" that posed an "existential threat" to the local citizenry.

Hong-Kong-Big-Top-AP.jpg?ve=1&tl=1

Medical staff wearing eyepatch stage a protest against police brutality to the protesters, at a hospital in Hong Kong, Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019. Demonstrators have in recent days focused on their demand for an independent inquiry into what they call the police's abuse of power and negligence. That followed reports and circulating video footage of violent arrests and injuries sustained by protesters. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

The demonstrators have shown no sign of letting up on their campaign to force Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam's administration to respond to their demands, including that she step down and entirely scrap legislation that could have seen criminal suspects sent to mainland China to face torture and unfair or politically charged trials.

While Beijing tends to define terrorism broadly, extending it especially to nonviolent movements opposing government policies in minority regions such as Tibet and Xinjiang, the government's usage of the term in relation to Hong Kong raised the prospect of greater violence and the possible suspension of legal rights for those detained.

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China says Hong Kong’s protest movement ‘near terrorism’; clashes erupt in streets

Marius Zaharia and Joyce Zhou

Hong Kong

Reuters

Published August 14, 2019

China said on Wednesday Hong Kong’s protest movement had reached “near terrorism”, as more street clashes followed ugly scenes a day earlier at the airport where demonstrators set upon two men they suspected of being government sympathizers.

By nightfall, police and protesters were again clashing on the streets, with riot officers shooting tear gas almost immediately as their response to demonstrators toughens.

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America’s Apathy Toward The Hong Kong Protests Is A Crisis Of Confidence

The protests in Hong Kong that began two months ago have now shut down the city’s airport—one of the busiest in the world—amid violent clashes with riot police in recent days. Chinese troops, we’re told, are amassing along the border even as Chinese propaganda outlets warned Tuesday that protesters were “asking for self-destruction” and Chinese officials decried the demonstrations as “deranged acts” that marked “the first signs of terrorism.”

In other words, it appears the situation is about to get much worse. Why has the American response to all this been so muted? Hong Kong is the most important city in the world right now, and the cause of the pro-democracy protesters is one that all Americans should rally behind.:snip:

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'Stand With Hong Kong!' Where Is the Free World's Reaganesque Response?

HONG KONG -- "Fight for freedom! Stand with Hong Kong!" This was the chant echoing through the arrival hall of Hong Kong's international airport on Tuesday, as thousands of protesters beseeched arriving passengers -- and the world -- for help in their struggle against China's encroaching tyranny.

It's a lonely fight, though it shouldn't be. The protesters' demands boil down to profoundly legitimate calls for liberty, justice, and accountable government.

During the protests that on Monday and Tuesday shut down flight operations for hours at one of Asia's busiest airports, thousands of protesters papered everything from the walkways to the information desks to the baggage trolleys with posters and leaflets apologizing for the inconvenience, detailing police brutality and demanding "Free Hong Kong." On Monday, over the main pedestrian entry ramps, they put up a big blue and white sign saying "PRESIDENT TRUMP, PLEASE LIBERATE HONG KONG," surrounded by American flags. On the walls, they posted signs with messages such as: "Hong Kong is not safe without democracy.":snip:

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3 hours ago, Geee said:

America’s Apathy Toward The Hong Kong Protests Is A Crisis Of Confidence

The protests in Hong Kong that began two months ago have now shut down the city’s airport—one of the busiest in the world—amid violent clashes with riot police in recent days. Chinese troops, we’re told, are amassing along the border even as Chinese propaganda outlets warned Tuesday that protesters were “asking for self-destruction” and Chinese officials decried the demonstrations as “deranged acts” that marked “the first signs of terrorism.”

In other words, it appears the situation is about to get much worse. Why has the American response to all this been so muted? Hong Kong is the most important city in the world right now, and the cause of the pro-democracy protesters is one that all Americans should rally behind.:snip:

 

Practically speaking What should/can we do at this time? I missed the part where he said that.

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'It's All for Our Kids': Hong Kong's Protesters Double Down on Demands for Freedom - Claudia Rossett

HONG KONG --  Undaunted by Chinese troops drilling just across the border and Beijing's threats about perishing by fire, Hong Kong's protesters on Sunday amplified their calls for freedom and democracy. They held a huge rally in which hundreds of thousands spilled peacefully over the cramped boundaries set by police. Some protesters brought their children. Everyone sweltered under the subtropical summer sun, then got soaked in a torrential cloudburst. Most of the protesters then carried on for hours more in the lingering rain, umbrellas deployed and feet wet, calling for "Free Hong Kong" and "Democracy now!":snip::snip:

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All Free Men Are Citizens Of Hong Kong

Instead of saying the German for “I am a jelly doughnut” at the Brandenburg Gate in 1963, President John F. Kennedy would have done better to declare, “Ich bin ein Hongkonger.”

Chinese forces are apparently preparing for a possible invasion to quell demonstrators within the Pearl of the Orient, many sporting American flags. Its citizens want full freedoms and a cessation of interference from a Beijing government that has learned well how to use limited market economics to its advantage while maintaining a political despotism and the kind of expansionist aims to be expected from a Marxist-Leninist regime.

The paramount concern, of course, should be for the innocents within Hong Kong who might soon find themselves in the midst of a repeat of Tiananmen Square. But a Hong Kong under siege has further meaning in the eyes of the world.

It continues to be what it has been for decades, a living reminder that people anywhere can do anything if they have economic freedom. Hong Kong is a shining, unassailable testament to the power of unfettered capitalism.:snip:

 

 

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I Just Spent A Month In Hong Kong: Here’s What You Need To Know

spent July in Hong Kong. It’s a regular part of my year as director of an international program for undergraduates. But this summer the city was immersed in protests. And I witnessed something inspirational, disquieting, and foreboding. I saw a people fighting for the character of their country. 

Background

Hongkongers have been protesting since the introduction of an extradition bill which would have enabled citizens, residents, and potentially visitors to be sent to mainland China for trial. The reaction was as immediate as the implications were recognizable. Dissenters could be handed over to a regime which dubiously defines crimes and where prisoners are made to commit suicide.

In the face of such a reality, two million of Hong Kong’s seven million came out in protest.  Though the bill has been suspended, protests have continued for 11 straight weeks. In part this is because there is an important distinction between “suspended” and “withdrawn.” A suspended bill can be ushered through more rapidly than new legislation subject to normal procedures. Anyone who studies politics knows this is how things are done: wait until people become complacent, and then pass legislation in the quiet of the night. But the protests have become about more than the extradition bill. Hongkongers are fighting for self-government. :snip:

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