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China's Han Superstate: The New Third Reich

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china-third-reich

Gordon G. Chang
April 3, 2019

  • China's ruler, Xi Jinping, demands that the five recognized religions — official recognition is a control mechanism — "Sinicize." The Chinese, as a part of this ruthless and relentless effort, are destroying mosques and churches, forcing devout Muslims to drink alcohol and eat pork, inserting Han officials to live in Muslim homes, and ending religious instruction for minors.

  • In recent years, there have been many ugly portrayals of Africans in Chinese media, and although the skit last year was not the worst, it was striking because the main state broadcaster, by airing it to about 800 million viewers, made it clear Chinese officials think of Africans as both objects of derision and subhuman.

  • Concentration camps, racism, eugenics, ambitions of world domination. Sound familiar?

  • There is a new Third Reich, and it is China.

 

More than a million people, for no reason other than their ethnicity or religion, are held in concentration camps in what Beijing calls the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region and what traditional inhabitants of the area, the Uighurs, say is East Turkestan. In addition to Uighurs, ethnic Kazakhs are also held in these facilities.

Families in this troubled area, shown on maps as the northwestern portion of the People's Republic of China, are being torn apart. The children of imprisoned Uighur and Kazakh parents are "confined" to "schools" that are separated from the outside by barbed wire and heavy police patrols. They are denied instruction in their own language, forced to learn Mandarin Chinese. The controls are part of a so-called "Hanification" policy, a program of forced assimilation. "Han" is the name of China's dominant ethnic group.

Because Uighurs and Kazakhs are dying in the camps in considerable numbers, Beijing is building crematoria to eradicate burial traditions while disposing of corpses.

(Snip)

He Jiankui of Shenzhen's Southern University of Science and Technology announced in November that he had used CRISPR to edit human embryos that produced live births, in this case twins girls. He claimed he was making the babies resistant to HIV, but there is speculation he was also trying to enhance intelligence. In any event, the announcement evoked Nazi eugenics experiments, especially because there is evidence that the Chinese government had backed He's "world's first" experiment, considered unethical and dangerous.

Certainly dangerous is Xi Jinping. "Mao Zedong may have played on the Third World's racial resentments when trying to unite former colonial peoples against white imperialists, but he thought that Communism was a global phenomenon that would eventually find a home everywhere and Mao's utopia was in the future," the Hudson Institute's Charles Horner told Gatestone. "Xi Jinping's Chinese Communist Party is not global or utopian in this way; instead, it seems in thrall to an essential 'Chinese-ness.'"

Horner sees disconcerting similarities between Xi's China and 1930s Imperial Japan. "Like Imperial Japan then," Horner said, "Xi and the Party look backward to a mythologized past when a benign Emperor brought the whole world together to bask in his glory and share his munificence."

Concentration camps, racism, eugenics, ambitions of world domination. Sound familiar?

There is a new Third Reich, and it is China.

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A chilling look at a Chinese “thought transformation” camp

June 24 2019

In the 1930s the Soviet government used to take Western visitors on carefully-staged tours of selected prisons. All too often the visitors came away impressed by these phony displays which disguised the brutal realities.

(Snip)

 

Jun 18, 2019

 

The BBC has been given rare access to the vast system of highly secure facilities thought to be holding more than a million Muslims in China’s western region of Xinjiang. Authorities there insist they are just training schools.
But the BBC’s visit uncovers important evidence about the nature of the system and the conditions for the people inside it.
The BBC's China Correspondent John Sudworth sent this report.

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