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Indians and the Confederacy, Part 1: "Civilizing" The Five Nations

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Indians and the Confederacy, Part 1: "Civilizing" The Five Nations

11/15/2018 Chris Calton

 Season 3, Episode 31.

In 1861, the Five Civilized Tribes — the Cherokees, Creeks, Chickasaws, Choctaws, and Seminoles — would be faced with the decision of staying neutral or choosing a side in the Civil War. To understand their decision, Chris Calton takes a look at the long history of Indians becoming, in the eyes of Americans, "civilized".

Chris Calton recounts the controversial history of the Civil War. This is the 31st episode in the third season of Historical Controversies. You may support this podcast financially at Mises.org/SupportHC

 https://mises-media.s3.amazonaws.com/Historical Controversies Episode 67.mp3?file=1&type=audio

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Indians and the Confederacy, Part 2: The Cherokee Nation

2 HOURS AGO Chris Calton

Season 3, Episode 31 

After being forced to move west during the Trail of Tears, the Cherokee Nation was bitterly divided into two factions. Although they remained officially unified, the factionalism remained through the Civil War and reemerged as a division between the Cherokee who favored the Union, or at least neutrality, and those who wanted to ally with the Confederacy. Similar to the border states, the decision to join the Confederacy was controversial, and many Native Americans refused to fall in line, demonstrating that the alliance with the Confederacy was not as simple as many historians make it seem. 

Chris Calton recounts the controversial history of the Civil War. You may support this podcast financially at Mises.org/SupportHC.

https://mises-media.s3.amazonaws.com/Historical-Controversies-68-20181121.mp3?file=1&type=audio

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Indians and the Confederacy, Part 3: The Trail of Blood on Ice

11/29/2018  Chris Calton

Season 3, Episode 33 

With many of the Civilized Indians wishing to remain neutral in the Civil War, a Muscogee leader named Opothle Yahola led a group of thousands of fugitives to Kansas. As they fled, Confederate soldiers, along with their Native American allies, gave chase, fighting a series of battles known as the Trail of Blood on Ice.

Chris Calton recounts the controversial history of the Civil War. You may support this podcast financially at Mises.org/SupportHC. 

 

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Cherokee Slaves

 The Cherokee Declaration of Independence: Why the ...


Slaveholding among the Cherokees had greatly increased in the years after 1839, and by 1860 there were nearly 4000 African slaves among 21,000 Cherokee — with 10 percent owning more than one slave. Had the Cherokee sided with the North in 1861, they would have kept their slaves.
Bernhard Thuersam, www.Circa1865.org    The Great American Political Divide

Cherokee Slaves

“The institution of black slavery among the Cherokees had a major impact on their economic growth after 1839 as well as on the emerging division between full-bloods and mixed bloods. It also dealt a fatal blow to Cherokee sovereignty after 1861, forcing the nation to choose between siding with the Union or the Confederacy.

While Indian tradition had for centuries allowed a form of slavery for captured enemies, the southeastern Indians never had much economic use for Indian captives. Probably as many captives were adopted into the tribe of their captors as were enslaved, and more were simply killed in rituals of tribal vengeance.  :snip:  

Posted by Brock Townsend at Saturday, December 08, 2018 

https://freenorthcarolina.blogspot.com/2018/12/cherokee-slaves.html

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