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Green Chile Salsa Recipe

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Green Chile Salsa Recipe

Makes. About 4 cups, enough for at least a dozen burgers

Prep and cooking time. About 1 hour.

Ingredients

3 green Hatch New Mexico #20, or Hatch New Mexico 6-4 peppers, or Anaheim peppers

1 green jalape;ño pepper

1 green poblano pepper

1 tomatillo

1 medium onion, peeled, and sliced in half

2 tablespoons of olive oil

2 large garlic cloves

2 tablespoons cilantro leaves

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

2 pinches ground black pepper

1 tablespoon lime juice

Want more heat? Add another jalapeÐo, or substitute 2 serranos for the jalapeño, or add a few splashes of green hot sauce. But taste it first.

About the lime juice. You can substitute lemon juice or cider vinegar, but I prefer lime juice for its brightness.

Want more flavor? Throw some wood chips onto the coals or into an aliminum pan resting on top of your gas burner when you are grilling the peppers, tomatillo, and onion.

Method

1) Split the peppers in half lengthwise, cut off the stems, and remove the seeds. Leave in the veins because that's where the heat lives. Place them on the grill over medium high or high direct heat, skin side down until the skin blackens and blisters, about 5 minutes. If you're working indoors, you can put them under the broiler skin side up or if you have a gas stove, hold them over a open flame with tongs (and an oven mit). When the skin is black, put the peppers in a bowl and cover them with a dinner plate so they will steam. You can also put them in a paper bag and crumple the top. The steam will help loosen the skin. After about 5 minutes, open the bowl or bag, and when the peppers are cool enough to handle, slip into rubber gloves and peel off the skins. If a little char remains, don't sweat it. If you work bare handed, wash thoroughly with soap and avoid touching any moist part of your body, or your lover's. You can skip the process of skinning the peppers, but if you do it is especially important to blend them well in step 3 to break down the skins.

2) While the peppers are grilling, put the onions on the grill face down until they have nice grill marks. Roll over and grill until the round side is charred. Discard the burned layer. While the onions are grilling, cut the tomatillo in half and roll around on the grill until soft, but don't let it burn.

3) Coarsely chop the peppers, onions, and tomatillo. Chop the garlic fine or smush it in a garlic press and keep the separate from the other ingredients. Warm the oil over medium high heat in a frying pan, add the garlic and cook for about 2 minutes, just enough to soften it. Now peeled peppers, onions, tomatillos, salt, and pepper. Be careful not to lean over the pan. That's pepper spray, man.

4) Add 1/4 cup of water and cook until it is mostly evaporated and the salsa is getting thick.

5) Dump the whole thing into a blender, add the lime juice and cilantro, and pulse until it is a pulp, but not quite smooth. Taste and adjust the salt, pepper, cilantro, and juice to your preference. If you want it hotter, a few splashes of green hot sauce will do the job. You can put this in a clean jar and keep it in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

6) To make the patty, follow the instructions in my article The Science of Burgers. I recommend a 6 ounce burger so the sauce is not lost among the other flavors.

7) Toast your buns. If you wish, on the bottom halves, place pickle slices, a slice of tomato, chopped onion, and lettuce, in that order. Or skip them and just go with the salsa and cheese.

8) Cook the burgers until they are about 5°F below the desired temp. Spoon at least 2 rounded tablespoons of salsa on top. More if you wish. Then place the slice of cheese on top of the salsa and cover the grill so the cheese will melt quickly. If you wish, you can place a metal bowl over the burger to speed the melting of the cheese. After about 2 minutes, when the cheese is droopy, slide the burger onto the bottom bun with a spatula, place the top bun on and serve.

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I have a deep love for good TexMex...followed by good New Mexico "Mexican" food and sauce..... neither is very available here in Raleigh... 

One chain TexMex (On the Border) near us closed to our dismay...   however, it was replaced by a great new Mexican restaurant that  has become a favorite with a very different approach to their dishes.   (God is good!)

http://www.fogatabrava.com/

Their chili relleno with saute squash is amazing...

348s.jpg

The also have a flan with icecream side (made with goat milk) that's my favorite.

 

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16 hours ago, NCTexan said:

I have a deep love for good TexMex...followed by good New Mexico "Mexican" food and sauce..... neither is very available here in Raleigh... 

One chain TexMex (On the Border) near us closed to our dismay...   however, it was replaced by a great new Mexican restaurant that  has become a favorite with a very different approach to their dishes.   (God is good!)

http://www.fogatabrava.com/

Their chili relleno with saute squash is amazing...

348s.jpg

The also have a flan with icecream side (made with goat milk) that's my favorite.

 

Condiments

"Failure is the condiment that gives success its flavor." Truman Capote

Defining a condiment is almost as troublesome as defining barbecue. Technically condiments are flavor elements added to enhance dishes after they are prepared, often as a topping, often applied at tableside by the diner. Some are like sauces such as ketchup, and others are chunky like relishes or chutneys. There is no hard and fast definition, espeically when one tries to define the difference between a sauce and a condiment especially since some condiments are used in making sauces and other dishes. If ketchup is a condiment, why isn't barbecue sauce? Or is it? Is pesto a sauce or a condiment? How about hot sauces? Makes my head hurt.  :snip:   http://amazingribs.com/recipes/condiments/index.html

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