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The Art of Being Offended: Part One

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art-offended-part-oneRedState: The Art of Being Offended: Part One

By: chrisshugart (Diary) | August 19th, 2015 at 08:04 PM

 

Our Victim Culture

 

The victim culture in this country has been turning out countless numbers of indignant sufferers who can cry out their personal brand of injustice with the convincing wail of a child that dropped their ice cream scoop onto the sidewalk. These martyrs have gotten so good that they could start their own professional league. It’s practically a spectator sport as it is.

 

You hardly ever know in advance who you’re going to offend or the reason why. Then suddenly someone leaps out, having identified their target of opportunity, and then delivers their war cry: “That’s offensive!” And for some reason it’s become mandatory that you immediately cease and desist whatever activity set off this self-righteous victim into such an indignant rage.

 

In both cases, the private conversations of Sterling and Hogan were evidence that they harbored racist thoughts. Yet neither committed a statutory crime nor did they even imply that one had been committed. So what was there offense? What did they do? Nothing. But it’s not their deeds for which they’ve been penalized. It’s their thoughts behind the deed that got them into trouble. Scissors-32x32.png


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I’M offended!

Change America to suit me because I am special.

 

By: nmaab (Diary) | December 16th, 2015 at 09:06 AM

 

(Tongue in cheek, but something to think about over Christmas, holiday, winter break.

Coffee shop conversation in a small West Texas town, late 1980s.

 

“So, you’re telling me we have to take down the Ten Commandments, Why?” “A small group of people in L.A. are offended.” “Our population hasn’t changed since the 30s, and none of those people even know where Muleshoe Texas is, so why do we have to take it down?” “Someone was offended.” “But, we love our courthouse yard, just the way it is.” “I know that, but someone was offended and if someone brings a suit against us, you know we don’t have the money to fight. It’s for the best to just take it down.” “But we love it.” “I know, but someone 1,000 miles away was offended.” http://www.redstate.com/diary/nmaab/2015/12/16/im-offended/ Scissors-32x32.png

 

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Mayor Landrieu created a firestorm, stoked racial divisions, and attacked the city’s history, all to promote his political career.

 

A monumental victory for political correctness in New Orleans

 

By Jeff Crouere -- Bio and Archives December 19, 2015

Yesterday, in the “City that Care Forgot,” New Orleans politicians displayed very little care for their city’s history, but showed they cared a great deal for political correctness.

 

In a 6-1 vote, City Council members passed an ordinance supported by Mayor Mitch Landrieu to declare four historic Confederate monuments “nuisances” and remove them from the city landscape. It was a big political victory for Landrieu who created this controversy after the murder of nine African Americans in Charleston, South Carolina, by a racist white maniac in June Scissors-32x32.pnghttp://canadafreepress.com/index.php/article/77641

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What Does It Mean to Be Offended?

 

Quinn the Eskimo / December 29, 2015 / 38 COMMENTS

 

We hear all the time about people “being offended” or finding something “offensive” and it occurs to me that I’m not even sure I know what those words mean anymore. Or maybe I’m largely beyond the capacity to take offense.

 

Sometimes, it seems like little more than “I don’t like that you said that” without reference to any real emotional experience of offense. If someone called me “a money-grubbing Jew,” I’m not sure I would think much more than that the person who said it was an idiot. But it wouldn’t hurt my feelings because I wouldn’t respect the opinion of the person who said it. I suppose that’s a quaint attitude, but someone is going to have to try a lot harder to get my monocle to fall into the champagne glass. Scissors-32x32.png

https://ricochet.com/what-does-it-mean-to-be-offended/

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The Problem With Georgetown’s “Old South Ball”

 

Because a dance is the best way to learn about this dark time in U.S. history.

 

January 12, 2016By Doyin Oyeniyi34 Comments

The city of Georgetown decided to kick off the new year by organizing a ball for January 30 at the Williamson County Courthouse. The theme and name of the ball? “Old South Ball: A Civil War Soiree.” The “soiree,” listed as the Civil War Ball on the Williamson Museum’s event calendar, invites people to attend in period attire and “enjoy the music of the 1860s” for just $25 per person and $40 per couple. According to a report by the Austin American-Statesman, Georgetown City Council helped promote the ball with a grant of $1,500.

 

There are several things wrong with this, and I’m not the only one who thinks so. A group called Positive Change for Georgetown has gathered more than a hundred signatures on an online petition asking the Williamson Museum to reconsider the ball’s theme. According to the petition, honoring the Civil War, “one of the darkest times in American history,” with a ball is chock full of white privilege. Scissors-32x32.png

http://www.texasmonthly.com/the-daily-post/museum-plans-to-hold-the-old-south-ball-a-soiree-for-the-civil-war/

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Should Houston’s Lanier Middle School Lose Its Name Because Of Confederate Ties?

 

Sidney Lanier was in the Confederate Army, but that wasn’t his legacy.

 

 

January 14, 2016

By John Nova Lomax 14 Comments

In the aftermath of last year’s Dylann Roof massacre, Houston once again confronted its Confederate past. There were calls to remove certain statues from city parks, to rechristen certain streets, and to rename several schools dubbed after Confederate leaders.

 

As of late last year, that list of educational institutions was comprised of high schools bearing the names of Confederate president Jefferson Davis, postmaster general John Reagan, and top commander of the Confederate Army Robert E. Lee. Also on the list were middle schools named after rebel generals Stonewall Jackson, Texan Albert Sidney Johnston, and Dick Dowling, the Irish-born Houstonian whose small batallion of cannoneers once staved off an amphibious federal invasion of East Texas.

 

It seemed like a judicious plan. Although some of those men made contributions to Houston (or Texas) above and beyond their Confederate service, Scissors-32x32.pnghttp://www.texasmonthly.com/the-daily-post/lanier-middle-school-name-change/

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Mayor Landrieu created a firestorm, stoked racial divisions, and attacked the city’s history, all to promote his political career.

 

A monumental victory for political correctness in New Orleans

 

By Jeff Crouere -- Bio and Archives December 19, 2015

Yesterday, in the “City that Care Forgot,” New Orleans politicians displayed very little care for their city’s history, but showed they cared a great deal for political correctness.

 

In a 6-1 vote, City Council members passed an ordinance supported by Mayor Mitch Landrieu to declare four historic Confederate monuments “nuisances” and remove them from the city landscape. It was a big political victory for Landrieu who created this controversy after the murder of nine African Americans in Charleston, South Carolina, by a racist white maniac in June Scissors-32x32.pnghttp://canadafreepress.com/index.php/article/77641

eb 5, 2:39 PM EST

 

JUDGE RULES AGAINST OPPONENTS OF CONFEDERATE STATUE REMOVAL

BY CAIN BURDEAU

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- A state judge ruled Friday against an effort by preservationists to stop the removal of prominent Confederate monuments in New Orleans.

 

Civil District Court Judge Piper D. Griffin said the city did not act improperly in deciding to take down four monuments tied to Confederate history, including a towering column and statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

 

Griffin denied a request to stop the city from moving forward with its plans. The plaintiffs said they would appeal.

 

The state suit deals with three of the four monuments: statues of Jefferson Davis, the Confederate president, P.G.T. Beauregard, a Louisiana-born Confederate general, and Lee. A fourth monument, an obelisk to the White League's attempt to overthrow a biracial government after the Civil War, is under a federal consent decree. Scissors-32x32.pnghttp://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_NEW_ORLEANS_CONFEDERATE_MONUMENTS?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2016-02-05-13-14-38

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Virtue Whistles
Mitch Berg
April 5, 2016

SCENE: Mitch BERG is shopping in the dairy aisle at Target in Roseville.

Suddenly, Avery LIBRELLE rounds the corner. With LIBRELLE is Ashley FIGG, a young woman of apparently mixed but minority-ish ethnicity.

LIBRELLE: Merg! It’s time for you to admit your privilege!

BERG: OK. I was born into an intact family who made sure I stayed in school, kept my pants zipped until I could support a family, and ensured I grew up knowing that actions consequences.

LIBRELLE: No, no, no. You’re white! I want to introduce you to Ashley Figg. She is a student at Macalester College.

BERG: Ms. Figg.

(FIGG glowers at BERG)

LIBRELLE: We’re going to have a debate!

BERG: A debate?

LIBRELLE: Yes. First, Ms. Figg.

BERG: …I”m not really…

FIGG: You are white. You have privilege.

LIBRELLE: Your turn, Merg.

BERG: Um, OK. Ms. Figg, what is it you would have us do about this “privilege” you talk about.

FIGG: The fact that you even ask is racist.

 

(Snip)

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Purpose

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOqvP7YyrEI

The Abbeville Institute was founded in 2002 by a group of scholars in history, literature, philosophy, religion, and other disciplines who conducted a conference on “Modernity and the Southern Tradition” at the University of Virginia. We were concerned that the Southern tradition is no longer taught in colleges and universities except as a function of the ideological needs of others. With few exceptions, the Southern tradition is presented as little more than the story of racism and slavery. Eugene Genovese, a distinguished historian of the South—a Northerner and a man of the left—has been a rare voice in criticizing this effort to purge the Southern tradition and its symbols from the American landscape. In the Massey lectures he gave at Harvard in 1994 he had this to say: “Rarely these days, even on southern campuses, is it possible to acknowledge the achievements of the white people of the South …. To speak positively about any part of this southern tradition is to invite charges of being a racist and an apologist for slavery and segregation. We are witnessing a cultural and political atrocity—an increasingly successful campaign by the media and an academic elite to strip young white southerners, and arguably black southerners as well, of their heritage, and, therefore, their identity. They are being taught to forget their forbearers or to remember them with shame.” Scissors-32x32.pnghttp://www.abbevilleinstitute.org/principles/

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Confederate Memorial Hall and Jack Daniels

 

By Philip Leigh on

 

Aug 22, 2016

In 1935 the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) constructed Confederate Memorial Hall as a residence for girls at Nashville’s Peabody College. Originally residents who were descendants of Confederate veterans and agreed to become teachers were granted free room and board. The school and dormitory were acquired by Vanderbilt University in 1979. Earlier this month university chancellor, Nicholas Zeppos, announced that the name “Confederate” will be sandblasted off of the building.

 

Ironically, it is unlikely that Zeppos would be paid anything close to his $2.2 million salary except for the Confederate sympathies of Cornelius’s second wife, Frank Crawford Vanderbilt, and the contributions of countless Confederate descendants over the years. It is equally unlikely that any of the school’s prominent graduates—including Board of Trust members who appointed Zeppos—would have even attended the university. Scissors-32x32.png

http://www.abbevilleinstitute.org/blog/confederate-memorial-hall-and-jack-daniels/

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Mayor Landrieu created a firestorm, stoked racial divisions, and attacked the city’s history, all to promote his political career.

 

A monumental victory for political correctness in New Orleans

 

By Jeff Crouere -- Bio and Archives December 19, 2015

Yesterday, in the “City that Care Forgot,” New Orleans politicians displayed very little care for their city’s history, but showed they cared a great deal for political correctness.

 

In a 6-1 vote, City Council members passed an ordinance supported by Mayor Mitch Landrieu to declare four historic Confederate monuments “nuisances” and remove them from the city landscape. It was a big political victory for Landrieu who created this controversy after the murder of nine African Americans in Charleston, South Carolina, by a racist white maniac in June Scissors-32x32.pnghttp://canadafreepress.com/index.php/article/77641

eb 5, 2:39 PM EST

 

JUDGE RULES AGAINST OPPONENTS OF CONFEDERATE STATUE REMOVAL

BY CAIN BURDEAU

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- A state judge ruled Friday against an effort by preservationists to stop the removal of prominent Confederate monuments in New Orleans.

 

Civil District Court Judge Piper D. Griffin said the city did not act improperly in deciding to take down four monuments tied to Confederate history, including a towering column and statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

 

Griffin denied a request to stop the city from moving forward with its plans. The plaintiffs said they would appeal.

 

The state suit deals with three of the four monuments: statues of Jefferson Davis, the Confederate president, P.G.T. Beauregard, a Louisiana-born Confederate general, and Lee. A fourth monument, an obelisk to the White League's attempt to overthrow a biracial government after the Civil War, is under a federal consent decree. Scissors-32x32.pnghttp://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_NEW_ORLEANS_CONFEDERATE_MONUMENTS?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2016-02-05-13-14-38

 

I say, remove not the cenotaphs thy mothers and grandmothers have set.

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VICTORY in Alexandria! Confederate Monument to STAY PUT

Via Susan

24cc32f1-48ef-4730-99b7-28489a61f7b8.jpg
It appears that Alexandria's lawmakers have taken the pulse of their constituents and decided that trying to move the monument would not be good for their political careers! They have REFUSED Alexandria City Council's request to petition the legislature for permission to remove the monument. "Appomattox" will remain right where he should!

Posted by

Brock Townsend at Wednesday, November 30, 2016 No comments: Links to this post

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Susan Hathaway's Remarks to Charlottesville City Council 12-19-2016

Published on Dec 20, 2016

On Monday, December 19th, Charlottesville City Council received the final report from the Blue Ribbon Commission appointed to "study" the issue of the city's Confederate monuments and memorials. During the Matters by the Public, Susan Hathaway of the Virginia Flaggers delivered a message to City Council.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56lfHVOSruM

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Attack on Robert E. Lee is an Assault on American History Itself

By Allan Brownfield on Feb 14, 2017

 

Early in February, the City Council of Charlottesville, Virginia voted 3-2 to remove a bronze equestrian monument to Robert E. Lee that stands in a downtown park named in his honor. Vice Mayor Wes Belamy, the council’s only African American member, led the effort to remove the statue. In the end, this vote may be largely symbolic. Those opposed to the statue’s removal intend to file a lawsuit and point to a state statute that says Virginia cities have no authority over the war memorials they inherited from past generations. “If such are erected,” the law reads, “it shall be unlawful for the authorities of the locality, or any other person or persons, to disturb or interfere with any monuments or memorials so erected.”

 

The attack on the Robert E. Lee statue is, in reality, an attack on American history itself. It has been suggested that the Washington Monument and Jefferson Memorial are inappropriate, since they celebrate men who owned slaves. Those who seek to erase our history sound a bit like the Taliban and ISIS, who are busy destroying historic structures all over the Middle East if they predate the rise of Islam. History is what it is, a mixed bag of mankind’s strengths and weaknesses, Scissors-32x32.png https://www.abbevilleinstitute.org/blog/attack-on-robert-e-lee-is-an-assault-on-american-history-itself/

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Charlottesville R E Lee Monument Update/Call To Action

Via Susan

We have received numerous inquiries for updates on the legal proceedings and other plans for Charlottesville after the vote to attempt to remove the RE Lee statue and rename LEE Park. We have some new information to share with you…

From a legal aspect, we promised Charlottesville that there would be a heavy price to pay and we intend to deliver on that promise. Our friends at “Friends of C’Ville Monuments” have been busy preparing the first lawsuits, and we expect that they will be filed in the next few days. In the meantime, our attorney sent a letter to the City Attorney and City Council outlining our plans to follow up with more litigation over the next two months.

More @ The Virginia Flaggers

Posted by Brock Townsend at Wednesday, February 15, 2017

https://freenorthcarolina.blogspot.com/2017/02/charlottesville-r-e-lee-monument.html

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The tyranny of non-thought

View all posts from this blog

 

By:William Murchison | May 10, 2017

The sullen self-righteousness of the progressive left (i.e., "We're right, and the rest of you can go to the hot place!") glows on college campuses everywhere but also in big cities—such as my beloved New Orleans, come to think of it: a locality embroiled in useless controversy over the removal of four Confederate-themed statues.

City government wants to consign the public images of Jefferson Davis, P. G. T. Beauregard and even Robert E. Lee to a sanitized existence far from daily sight. (An obelisk marking local resistance to Louisiana's Reconstruction government is likewise targeted.) To what end?

On the surface, it's all about slavery and the universal—as well as praiseworthy—dislike of it today. At a psychologically deeper level, it's about expunging racial convictions that vanished long ago and seemingly require no expunging; save that when you drag dead white males into the picture in order to blacken their reputations you make a point useful to the progressive creed.

The point is, what an unsatisfactory people we were before we fell into confessional mode in the 1960s, discovering that almost everything we had done up to that point was corrupt, if not outrageous.  :snip: https://www.chroniclesmagazine.org/the-tyranny-of-non-thought/ 

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The Times Picayune  

Jefferson Davis statue in New Orleans removed early Thursday

Updated on May 11, 2017 at 9:09 AMPosted on May 10, 2017 at 10:11 PM

BY NOLA.COM

The Jefferson Davis statue in Mid-City was taken down early Thursday (May 11). It's one of four monuments the New Orleans City Council declared nuisances in December and the second Mayor Mitch Landrieu removed.

Below are updates from NOLA.com, from Wednesday night through Thursday morning, as events unfolded at the monument site on Canal Street at Jefferson Davis Parkway. The most recent updates are at the top of this page.

9:02 a.m. Crews are still at the monument attempting to move the pedestal on the statue sat. Commuters who normally travel through the area remain affected, as riverbound Canal Street remained closed. The streetcar line also was blocked at Jefferson David Parkway, and riders were still being transferred to shuttle buses at White Street to continue to their destinations. :snip: 

:snip: 

http://www.nola.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/05/jefferson_davis_statue_in_new_1.html#incart_river_home_pop

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New Orleans removes statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis after 106 years

CBS/AP May 11, 2017, 5:11 AM Last Updated May 11, 2017 6:03 AM EDT

NEW ORLEANS -- With dozens of demonstrators on both sides of a fierce debate over Southern history looking on from a distance, crews removed a statue early Thursday of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, reports CBS affiliate WWL-TV.

Workers labored under the cover of darkness to remove the statue, wearing bulletproof vests, masks and dark clothes to hide their identities in the wake of threats from thosewho opposed the statue's removal. City officials had refused to give advance public notice of the work because of threats of violence against contractors and workers involved in the effort. The statue was first unveiled in 1911.

As the statue was lifted from its perch on a grassy median along one of the city's main thoroughfares, a cheer went up from some of the dozens of protesters on the scene who have been pushing for the monument's removal. It was then lowered behind trucks encircled around the monument's base and out of view of media gathered on the scene. :snip: 

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/another-confederate-monument-being-removed-in-new-orleans/

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