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Austin just started this today: LINK

 

Austin has joined Philadelphia and Washington D.C. in adopting regulations requiring all businesses to install gender-neutral signs for single user public restrooms, according to a statement from the city.

 

A single user restroom is defined as a restroom in which the primary entry door is lockable and is available for use by any individual with or without assistance, including restrooms accessible only to employees.

 

These requirements to do not apply to restroom facilities with multiple stalls.

 

Under the new regulations, all existing businesses are required to replace their current gender-specific signs with gender-neutral signs. The type, size and design of the new signs are the responsibility of the business owner. These requirements also apply to remodels and new construction.

 

 

The type, size and design of the new signs are the responsibility of the business owner.

 

hmmm, that could lead to trouble....

 

On the radio the person being interviewed brought up how important these are for gay, lesbian, trans-gender and ... gender-confused.

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We have read that Soros funded the Ferguson unrest -at least $33 MILLION dollars funded to groups protesting Ferguson and Brown

"Bankrolling an Agenda" presented by a Washington Times Reporter on Fox and Friends.

"Soros wants social justice on a global scale by having ONE parry - The Democrat party"

 

As a reminder here are his officially known and funded groups as just listed on Fox and credited to Center for Responsive Politics

Open Society Institute

Center for american Progress

Media Matters for America

Moveon.org

ProPublica

Center for Public Integrity

 

Note all the media outlets. However the list is just the tip of the iceberg in his "web".

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Austin just started this today: LINK

 

Austin has joined Philadelphia and Washington D.C. in adopting regulations requiring all businesses to install gender-neutral signs for single user public restrooms, according to a statement from the city.

 

A single user restroom is defined as a restroom in which the primary entry door is lockable and is available for use by any individual with or without assistance, including restrooms accessible only to employees.

 

These requirements to do not apply to restroom facilities with multiple stalls.

 

Under the new regulations, all existing businesses are required to replace their current gender-specific signs with gender-neutral signs. The type, size and design of the new signs are the responsibility of the business owner. These requirements also apply to remodels and new construction.

 

 

The type, size and design of the new signs are the responsibility of the business owner.

 

hmmm, that could lead to trouble....

 

On the radio the person being interviewed brought up how important these are for gay, lesbian, trans-gender and ... gender-confused.

 

 

Should I be having these shooting pains in my head?

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Austin just started this today: LINK

 

Austin has joined Philadelphia and Washington D.C. in adopting regulations requiring all businesses to install gender-neutral signs for single user public restrooms, according to a statement from the city.

 

A single user restroom is defined as a restroom in which the primary entry door is lockable and is available for use by any individual with or without assistance, including restrooms accessible only to employees.

 

These requirements to do not apply to restroom facilities with multiple stalls.

 

Under the new regulations, all existing businesses are required to replace their current gender-specific signs with gender-neutral signs. The type, size and design of the new signs are the responsibility of the business owner. These requirements also apply to remodels and new construction.

 

 

The type, size and design of the new signs are the responsibility of the business owner.

 

hmmm, that could lead to trouble....

 

On the radio the person being interviewed brought up how important these are for gay, lesbian, trans-gender and ... gender-confused.

I still recall the first time I wandered into a gender neutral "toilette" room in a Paris department store. First I thought I had mistakenly entered the men's room when I saw all these guys from the shoulders up as I entered. I started to back out and then saw women coming out too. Can't express how confused and disoriented I felt. I left.

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At a restaurant in Brussels Mr.n. and I simultaneously went into our respective properly-labeled restrooms and came out on the other side of the doors into the same place! We about died laughing.

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Podcast: Episode 49: The Massacre in Paris and the Battle for New Orleans

January 12, 2015

 

First up on this week’s episode is Reuel Marc Gerecht, senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies and former Middle Eastern specialist at the CIA’s Directorate of Operations, who discusses the aftermath of last week’s brutal attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. He notes that France has been concerned about this kind of attack for some time, and discusses what it means for the rest of the world’s ability to deal with Islamic extremism. Gerecht also warns against over-inflating the prowess of those involved in the attack, before moving on to talk about what it might mean for the Schengen free movement area, and for the debate over the rise of the surveillance state.

 

Then, Wayne State College in Nebraska professor of history Don Hickey joins us to discuss the Battle of New Orleans, some few days after its 200th anniversary. He notes that while it was the last great battle of the War of 1812, the Battle of New Orleans had little impact on the war itself. Instead, Hickey argues, it had a lasting impact on how Americans remembered the war. He explains why Canadians tend to remember the war better than Americans do, and recaps some of the details of the battle itself—which wrapped up in less than half an hour—dispelling some common myths surrounding it.

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Podcast: Episode 49: The Massacre in Paris and the Battle for New Orleans

January 12, 2015

 

First up on this week’s episode is Reuel Marc Gerecht, senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies and former Middle Eastern specialist at the CIA’s Directorate of Operations, who discusses the aftermath of last week’s brutal attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. He notes that France has been concerned about this kind of attack for some time, and discusses what it means for the rest of the world’s ability to deal with Islamic extremism. Gerecht also warns against over-inflating the prowess of those involved in the attack, before moving on to talk about what it might mean for the Schengen free movement area, and for the debate over the rise of the surveillance state.

 

Then, Wayne State College in Nebraska professor of history Don Hickey joins us to discuss the Battle of New Orleans, some few days after its 200th anniversary. He notes that while it was the last great battle of the War of 1812, the Battle of New Orleans had little impact on the war itself. Instead, Hickey argues, it had a lasting impact on how Americans remembered the war. He explains why Canadians tend to remember the war better than Americans do, and recaps some of the details of the battle itself—which wrapped up in less than half an hour—dispelling some common myths surrounding it.

In an odd way, the Battle of New Orleans sounds more interesting to me. There is so much history I don't know and now I love it. Have 80 more pages of David McCullough's "1776" to read. Fascinating, amazing story. It's a miracl we ever became a republic.

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Podcast: Episode 49: The Massacre in Paris and the Battle for New Orleans

January 12, 2015

 

First up on this week’s episode is Reuel Marc Gerecht, senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies and former Middle Eastern specialist at the CIA’s Directorate of Operations, who discusses the aftermath of last week’s brutal attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. He notes that France has been concerned about this kind of attack for some time, and discusses what it means for the rest of the world’s ability to deal with Islamic extremism. Gerecht also warns against over-inflating the prowess of those involved in the attack, before moving on to talk about what it might mean for the Schengen free movement area, and for the debate over the rise of the surveillance state.

 

Then, Wayne State College in Nebraska professor of history Don Hickey joins us to discuss the Battle of New Orleans, some few days after its 200th anniversary. He notes that while it was the last great battle of the War of 1812, the Battle of New Orleans had little impact on the war itself. Instead, Hickey argues, it had a lasting impact on how Americans remembered the war. He explains why Canadians tend to remember the war better than Americans do, and recaps some of the details of the battle itself—which wrapped up in less than half an hour—dispelling some common myths surrounding it.

In an odd way, the Battle of New Orleans sounds more interesting to me. There is so much history I don't know and now I love it. Have 80 more pages of David McCullough's "1776" to read. Fascinating, amazing story. It's a miracl we ever became a republic.

 

 

 

Yup! May I suggest The Perils of Peace: America's Struggle for Survival After Yorktown

Thomas Fleming

 

On October 19, 1781, Great Britain's best army surrendered to General George Washington at Yorktown. But the future of the 13 former colonies was far from clear. A 13,000 man British army still occupied New York City, and another 13,000 regulars and armed loyalists were scattered from Canada to Savannah, Georgia. Meanwhile, Congress had declined to a mere 24 members, and the national treasury was empty. The American army had not been paid for years and was on the brink of mutiny.

 

In Europe, America's only ally, France, teetered on the verge of bankruptcy and was soon reeling from a disastrous naval defeat in the Caribbean. A stubborn George III dismissed Yorktown as a minor defeat and refused to yield an acre of "my dominions" in America. In Paris, Ambassador Benjamin Franklin confronted violent hostility to France among his fellow members of the American peace delegation.

 

In his riveting new book, Thomas Fleming moves elegantly between the key players in this drama and shows that the outcome we take for granted was far from certain. Not without anguish, General Washington resisted the urgings of many officers to seize power and held the angry army together until peace and independence arrived. With fresh research and masterful storytelling, Fleming breathes new life into this tumultuous but little known period in America's history.

 

 

We Dodged So Many Bullets In The Early Years. There are good reasons why so many revolutions end up in dictatorships. We came close on several occasions.

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What an odd way to rewrite a headline.....

 

"Supreme Court to make a decision if similar-sex couples can marry nationwide"

 

 

Similar-sex??

 

Not quite the same, just similar.....

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What an odd way to rewrite a headline.....

"Supreme Court to make a decision if similar-sex couples can marry nationwide"

Similar-sex??

Not quite the same, just similar.....

Could be using that term to prevent confusion if one or both members of the couple are going through a sex change... or are transgendered... or are bisexual... or... now I have a headache.

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What an odd way to rewrite a headline.....

"Supreme Court to make a decision if similar-sex couples can marry nationwide"

Similar-sex??

Not quite the same, just similar.....

Could be using that term to prevent confusion if one or both members of the couple are going through a sex change... or are transgendered... or are bisexual... or... now I have a headache.

 

 

50 years ago we won't not even be having this conversation....We're sure Progressing.

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Podcast: Episode 49: The Massacre in Paris and the Battle for New Orleans

January 12, 2015

 

First up on this week’s episode is Reuel Marc Gerecht, senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies and former Middle Eastern specialist at the CIA’s Directorate of Operations, who discusses the aftermath of last week’s brutal attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. He notes that France has been concerned about this kind of attack for some time, and discusses what it means for the rest of the world’s ability to deal with Islamic extremism. Gerecht also warns against over-inflating the prowess of those involved in the attack, before moving on to talk about what it might mean for the Schengen free movement area, and for the debate over the rise of the surveillance state.

 

Then, Wayne State College in Nebraska professor of history Don Hickey joins us to discuss the Battle of New Orleans, some few days after its 200th anniversary. He notes that while it was the last great battle of the War of 1812, the Battle of New Orleans had little impact on the war itself. Instead, Hickey argues, it had a lasting impact on how Americans remembered the war. He explains why Canadians tend to remember the war better than Americans do, and recaps some of the details of the battle itself—which wrapped up in less than half an hour—dispelling some common myths surrounding it.

In an odd way, the Battle of New Orleans sounds more interesting to me. There is so much history I don't know and now I love it. Have 80 more pages of David McCullough's "1776" to read. Fascinating, amazing story. It's a miracl we ever became a republic.

 

 

Yup! May I suggest The Perils of Peace: America's Struggle for Survival After Yorktown

Thomas Fleming

 

 

On October 19, 1781, Great Britain's best army surrendered to General George Washington at Yorktown. But the future of the 13 former colonies was far from clear. A 13,000 man British army still occupied New York City, and another 13,000 regulars and armed loyalists were scattered from Canada to Savannah, Georgia. Meanwhile, Congress had declined to a mere 24 members, and the national treasury was empty. The American army had not been paid for years and was on the brink of mutiny.

 

In Europe, America's only ally, France, teetered on the verge of bankruptcy and was soon reeling from a disastrous naval defeat in the Caribbean. A stubborn George III dismissed Yorktown as a minor defeat and refused to yield an acre of "my dominions" in America. In Paris, Ambassador Benjamin Franklin confronted violent hostility to France among his fellow members of the American peace delegation.

 

In his riveting new book, Thomas Fleming moves elegantly between the key players in this drama and shows that the outcome we take for granted was far from certain. Not without anguish, General Washington resisted the urgings of many officers to seize power and held the angry army together until peace and independence arrived. With fresh research and masterful storytelling, Fleming breathes new life into this tumultuous but little known period in America's history.

 

 

We Dodged So Many Bullets In The Early Years. There are good reasons why so many revolutions end up in dictatorships. We came close on several occasions.

 

I will definitely check that out. You haven't steered me wrong yet.

 

Actually, I think it was God's plan for this country to come out as it did, considering how things went in those early days. And other following days as well, come to think of it.

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@nickydog

 

 

Hey...Hey...That will just about enough of the God talk! Don't you know all the really really super duper smart people have told us there is no such thing? rolleyes.gif

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Just saw a TV ad for the State of the Union on USA network for MSNBC. All pumped up music, images of O smiling. Very strange to see State of the Union advertised.

..........worried.

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Just saw a TV ad for the State of the Union on USA network for MSNBC. All pumped up music, images of O smiling. Very strange to see State of the Union advertised.

..........worried.

Probably announce his official coup and sign off by tearing up a copy of the Constitution in a gesture of solidarity for one world government and globalization under him and Soros. ("They" know most of "them" (us) will not be watching).

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Howdy another 4 inches of snow overnight, so I will be outside in a few snow blowing the yard and road. Happy football day to you all!!!!

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Just saw a TV ad for the State of the Union on USA network for MSNBC. All pumped up music, images of O smiling. Very strange to see State of the Union advertised.

..........worried.

@clearvision.... wow a tv ad for the sotu? I don't think I have ever seen them advertise it before.

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Just saw a TV ad for the State of the Union on USA network for MSNBC. All pumped up music, images of O smiling. Very strange to see State of the Union advertised.

..........worried.

@clearvision.... wow a tv ad for the sotu? I don't think I have ever seen them advertise it before.

 

 

Maybe they're hoping 2 or 3 more people will watch. That won't include me, but I will catch the new senator from IA afterward!

 

Joni Ernst.

Edited by nickydog
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CNN... now officially it's own branch of whitehouse.gov.

 

Strange timing for their lead website headline today just prior to the State of the Union.

Snap2_zps26b3aa59.jpg

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CNN... now officially it's own branch of whitehouse.gov.

 

Strange timing for their lead website headline today just prior to the State of the Union.

 

Snap2_zps26b3aa59.jpg

 

Rush, in addressing this "fact" this morning, said most of the world's wealth belongs to governments, not individuals.

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