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Last Farewell to Robert E. Lee

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"Strike the Tent" Last Farewell to Robert E. Lee

By Calvin E. Johnson Jr. (Bio and Archives) Friday, October 11, 2013

 

The United States flag flew at half-mast when Robert E. Lee died!

 

Lee Chapel at Washington and Lee University is the site of annual programs paying tribute to Robert Edward Lee. On Monday, October 14, 2013 a program commemorating the Washington College presidency of Robert E. Lee on the 143rd anniversary of his death will feature War Between the States historian, Frank O’Reilly.

 

The lecture entitled “Adapt, Improvise, and Overcome: Robert E. Lee’s Greatest Victory at Chancellorsville” will begin at 12:15 p.m.

 

The New York Times reported:

 

Intelligence was received last evening of the death at Lexington, Va., of Gen. Robert E. Lee, the most famous of the officers whose celebrity was gained in the service of the Southern Confederacy during the late terrible rebellion.)—-New York Times, October 13, 1870.

 

October 12th is the 143rd anniversary of the passing of Robert E. Lee whose memory is still dear in the hearts of many people around the world.

 

General Lee died at his home at Lexington, Virginia at 9:30 AM on October 12, 1870. Scissors-32x32.pnghttp://canadafreepress.com/index.php/article/58487

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"The Character of Lee"

"He possessed every virtue of the great commanders, without their vices. He was a foe without hate; a friend without treachery; a private citizen without wrong; a neighbor without reproach; a Christian without hypocrisy, and a man without guilt. He was a Caesar without his ambition; a Frederick without his tyranny; a Napoleon without his selfishness; and a Washington without his reward. He was obedient to authority as a servant, and loyal in authority as a true king. He was gentle as a woman in life; modest and pure as a virgin in thought; watchful as a Roman vestal in duty; submissive to law as Socrates, and grand in battle as Achilles."
(From the Address of the Honorable B.H. Hill before the Georgia branch of the Southern Historical Society at Atlanta, February 18, 1874.) Scissors-32x32.pnghttp://www.civilwarhome.com/opinion.htm

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Robert E. Lee's Death

Robert E. Lee Birthday | Death of Robert E. Lee | Harper's Weekly 1863 Lee & Jackson Article | Robert E. Lee Bio in Harper's Weekly | Robert E. Lee Day | Robert E. Lee's Last Words

The Death of Robert E. Lee

Source: (A LIFE OF GEN. ROBERT E. LEE.

BY JOHN ESTEN COOKE.)

On the 28th of September, 1870, after laborious attention to his duties during the early part of the day, General Lee attended, in the afternoon, a meeting of the Vestry of Grace Church, of which he was a member. Over this meeting he presided, and it was afterward remembered that his last public act was to contribute the sum of fifty-five dollars to some good object, the requisite amount to effect which was thus made up.

Robert_E_Lee_Tomb_small.jpg

Robert E. Lee's Tomb

 

After the meeting, General Lee returned to his home, and, when tea was served, took his place at the table to say grace, as was his habit, as it had been in camp throughout the war. His lips opened, but no sound issued from them, and he sank back in his chair, from which he was carried to bed.  :snip:   http://www.sonofthesouth.net/leefoundation/Robert_E_Lee_death.htm    

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Lee the Specimen of True Manhood

 
 https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1328876338l/1547892.jpg

The greatest of American military men, indeed a “cavalier, soldier and citizen, Robert E. Lee “effaced self, refused gifts and high place, overcame the bufferings of fate, and in defeat was as calm as in victory.” The author Robert Winston relates a story of a young girl whose father was a diplomat in Rome during the second reign of Grover Cleveland. After seeing a portrait of Lee on her father’s office wall, she asked why a picture of a rebel was so prominently displayed. “Ah, my child,” the father replied, “you are yet too young to understand but someday you will – and so will the world.”
Bernhard Thuersam, www.Circa1865.com   The Great American Political Divide

Lee the Specimen of True Manhood

“During his imprisonment Jefferson Davis became a martyr for [the South] . . . Southerners saw in his imprisonment and the manacles and the other indignities a Christ-like figure suffering for their sins, and in the long years after his release. Davis’s struggle to regain his personal and financial fortunes mirrored those of all.

In 1870, when Lee died, [former vice president John] Breckinridge broke his resolution not to speak in public again by delivering a eulogy during memorial services in Louisville. “He failed,” the Kentuckian said of Lee. “The result is in the future. It may be better or for worse. We hope for the better.” :snip: 
https://freenorthcarolina.blogspot.com/2017/12/lee-specimen-of-true-manhood.html

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Sovereign Political Communities, Not “One People”

 
 http://lawreview.richmond.edu/files/2017/04/page3-2025px-Constitution_of_the_Confederate_States_of_America.djvu_-800x500-800x445.jpg

It is erroneously believed today that the United States Constitution followed the Declaration of Independence, though the Articles of Confederation were the first “Constitution.” It is recalled that the Articles were deemed by all parties to it as perpetual and a majority of States were required to approve any changes therein. Nonetheless, eleven States unconstitutionally seceded from the Articles in 1789 and inaugurated a new union – leaving North Carolina and Rhode Island as unaffiliated and independent States.
Bernhard Thuersam, www.Circa1865.com   The Great American Political Divide

Sovereign Political Communities, Not “One People”

“We have seen that the united colonies, when they declared their independence, formed a league or alliance with one another as the “United States.” This title antedated the adoption of the Articles of Confederation.

It was assumed immediately after the Declaration of Independence, and was continued under the Articles of Confederation; the first of which declared that “the style of this confederacy shall be “The United States of America”, and this style was retained – without question – in the formation of the present Constitution.:snip: 
https://freenorthcarolina.blogspot.com/2017/12/sovereign-political-communities-not-one.html

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The Trial That Didn’t Happen

ALLEN C. GUELZO

10 MIN READ

April 13, 2018 01:10 AM

Did Robert E. Lee commit treason?

Treason is defined by the Constitution in Article 3, section three, as consisting in levying War against the United States or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. Stark as that prescription is, fewer than 30 people have been tried for treason by the federal courts. Two of these—Philip Wigle and John Mitchell—were convicted for their role in the 1794 Whiskey Rebellion but then pardoned by President George Washington. Aaron Burr was tried for treason after a failed conspiracy to set up his own political empire in the Mississippi Valley, but he eluded conviction because, as Chief Justice John Marshall reasoned, “war must actually be levied against the United States.” Burr’s plot hadn’t become more than a plot, and since “conspiracy [to levy war] is not treason,” Burr walked free.

But surely the oddest treason trial is one which never took place, that of Robert E. Lee. Surely, if anyone could be said to have levied war against the United States, it must have been the man who for four years inflicted one embarrassing defeat after another on United States troops during the Civil War and almost single-handedly kept the Southern Confederacy alive until its final expiry in 1865. :snip: https://www.weeklystandard.com/allen-c-guelzo/the-trial-that-didnt-happen

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