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Are we living on the hinge of history?If so what does it mean?

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#41 Valin

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 06:38 AM


One note: I think it is profoundly important that conservatives are aware of this. Valin is absolutely right about our side knowing what is coming, what is happening and engaging in it.

Whoever "futzes" with the gatekeeping owns the conversation and we can not cede that wholly to anyone. Even ourselves.

Very well put Posted Image


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfv4pzlDVfY

#42 Valin

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 09:10 AM


George Siemens, at the Technology Enhanced Knowledge Research Institute at Athabasca Universityhas been running "Massive Open Online Courses" (MOOCs). I talk to him about what a MOOC is, how it works, and the educational philosophy behind it.

#43 Valin

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 06:08 AM




#44 righteousmomma

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 08:27 AM

The more things change the more they stay the same. Human nature is what it is. I was reminded of this fact this morning.
Chick Fil - A is being boycotted and banned by everyone from the mayor of Boston to the Muffet creators. Why? Simply because Chick Fil A believes the definition of marriage. One man, one woman.

(Civil unions in my opinion? Go for it.)

On another Forum I often got into a discussion about this issue with two guys who were pro same sex marriage. When all is said and done the main issue is one's belief in Who God is and the Truth and inspiration of the Bible. "They" believe in a nebulous universal God of love who demands nothing of us and expects nothing of us. To them The Bible is mankind's attempt to create a God of their own making and so filled with myths and stories. We who believe its Message, Precepts and Principles are deluded, ignorant (stupid) and bigoted.

However this kind of thinking, this kind of perspective
is no different than it was at the Advent of Christianity.
Christianity was a 180 degree revolutionary pivotal point in human history back then. The world had never seen its like before.
Thank our Father God that He chose to reveal Himself to the Israelites by calling forth men like Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Moses, Joshua, the Old (Hebrew) Testament Prophets, David, Solomon and a host of others who were humans just like us today.
Thank God that He Chose to restore and reconcile us to Himself.
Thank God for Grace and the Gift of the Holy Spirit who puts the Presence of the same resurrecting power and active force within us who accept and believe.

One of my favorite sayings is a paraphrase attributed to St Augustine:
In the Old Testament the New is concealed
In the New Testament the Old is revealed.
What so many fail to take into account is that mankind (Biblically called the natural man and the world) is dead to God and thus dead to God in Christ Jesus and in rebellion against God

#45 Valin

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 07:04 AM


Food For Thought

#46 Valin

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 07:26 AM

The more things change the more they stay the same. Human nature is what it is. I was reminded of this fact this morning.
Chick Fil - A is being boycotted and banned by everyone from the mayor of Boston to the Muffet creators. Why? Simply because Chick Fil A believes the definition of marriage. One man, one woman.

(Civil unions in my opinion? Go for it.)

On another Forum I often got into a discussion about this issue with two guys who were pro same sex marriage. When all is said and done the main issue is one's belief in Who God is and the Truth and inspiration of the Bible. "They" believe in a nebulous universal God of love who demands nothing of us and expects nothing of us. To them The Bible is mankind's attempt to create a God of their own making and so filled with myths and stories. We who believe its Message, Precepts and Principles are deluded, ignorant (stupid) and bigoted.



One of the reasons so many people no longer Believe, is they don't want someone/something to tell them how to live. Right & Wrong have become passe old fashioned. The idea of a God who Judges who has (dare I say) Standards...Well we are just sooo much more sophisticated today for that kind of primitive thought.
The good news is God made reality...and as the old saying goes...reality is a bi*ch. Societies can no more violate Gods standards without consequences than I can violate to laws of gravity without consequence, one just takes a little longer to manifest its self.

#47 Valin

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 04:27 PM

Update

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXdZvo4Dx4E
Food For Thought


Supercomputers Replace Wall Street Traders
Walter Russell Mead

Trading giant Morgan Stanley is planning to eliminate a number of positions by tapping computers that can make many trading decisions, according to the WSJ:

While the effort represents only a part of what the firm is doing to boost low returns in the business, the shift already has reduced the ranks of interest-rate and foreign-exchange traders on some desks by 10% to 20%.

Morgan Stanley’s head of interest-rate trading, Glenn Hadden, has told colleagues in recent months and that the trading floor of the future will surround a few traders with the hum of powerful machines. The unit, which has at least 200 staff according to industry estimates, has cut about 10% of staff on some trading desks. Morgan Stanley declines to discuss employment levels, but there according to these estimates the company employs more than 1,000 traders.

(Snip)

#48 righteousmomma

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 07:11 PM

Valin, have you seen this:
Mindset List: Class of 2016 doesn’t use radios or watch TVs, and sees women as leaders

MILWAUKEE — Remember when suitcases had to be carried instead of rolled? Or when an airline ticket was a booklet of pages separated by carbon paper? Maybe you remember when Lou Gehrig held the Major League record for consecutive baseball games. This year’s college freshmen don’t...

They never lived in a world where Kurt Cobain was alive or an NFL team played its home games in Los Angeles. The Class of 2016 has no need for radios, watches television everywhere except on actual TV sets and is addicted to “electronic narcotics.”
These are among the 75 references on this year’s Beloit College Mindset List, a nonscientific compilation is meant to remind teachers that college freshmen, born mostly in 1994, see the world in a much different way.
The students are also accustomed to seeing women in position of leadership. They came of age at a time when Madeleine Albright was serving as the first female U.S. secretary of state, and women have held the position for most of their lives.
And the old Hollywood stereotype of ditzy blonde women has given way to one of “dumb and dumber males,” according to the list.
“In general, there was always the complaint that it was too slow for women to get to positions of responsibility,” said Ron Nief, one of the two Beloit College officials who compiles the list. “Now the question is, ‘What took so long?’”
The compilation, released Tuesday, has been assembled every year since 1998 by Nief and Tom McBride, from the private school in southeastern Wisconsin. Over the years it has evolved into a national phenomenon, a cultural touchstone that entertains even as it makes people wonder where the years have gone.
The lists have begun attracting attention from government agencies, athletic organizations and other groups that want to know how the younger generation thinks. Nief and McBride will be sharing their insights with employees of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., in October.
The new generation gets a lot of its news from Jon Stewart’s “The Daily Show.” But if they miss an episode, they can always get instant news from YouTube (No. 5 on the list).
Here are some other items to make you feel old: These teens weren’t born when “Pulp Fiction” came out. Instead of asking who shot J.R., they wanted to know who shot Montgomery Burns. And to them, “Twilight Zone” is about vampires, not Rod Serling.
Thorin Blitz, 18, disagreed with that last item. He said it’s 13-year-old girls who watch “Twilight.”
“I’ve seen quite a few ‘Twilight Zone’ episodes,” said the incoming freshman from Charleston, Ill. “Most of us know what that is.”
Blitz’s comment reflects a common criticism of previous lists. Some teens were insulted by the insinuation that they had no knowledge of events that happened before they were born, as if they had never studied history. So Nief and McBride have softened the tone, replacing “They don’t know about...” with “They never experienced...”
The theme of last year’s list was how wired the incoming class was. This year’s class includes students who might be bitter at the previous generation, Nief said. While their elders went to college in good times and had jobs waiting for them, these students grew up watching their parents worry about unemployment and foreclosures.
That sentiment was captured in item No. 16, which notes unemployment has risen 2 percentage points in their lifetimes.
But they also live in an era of potential. Gene therapy has always been available, and they don’t waste time with outdated technologies like radios and point-and-shoot cameras.
They’re also less likely to identify with a specific religion. As item No. 3 notes, biblical terms such as “forbidden fruit,” ‘’the writing on the wall” and “good Samaritan” are unknown to most of them.
“When I teach Shakespeare or Milton there are a lot of biblical allusions,” said McBride, an English professor, “and I have to explain them all.”
------------------------------------------------
Rush talked about it today and I thought it pretty well makes the point that yes we stand on the hinge of history.

Horribly sad and tragic for us all.

#49 righteousmomma

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 07:18 PM

Btw Rush said (in part)

This is about societal evolution. But I think when I ran through it and started thinking about this Akin business, it's more important than ever that we save this country because we need to save it for people who have no idea it's in trouble. We need to save it for young people who have no idea that it is in any threatened state whatsoever. And if there's ever a role for adults to play, it is to protect and guarantee for their kids that which they sought for themselves. And what we're talking about here is preserving liberty and freedom from which everything else in this country sprang.



#50 Valin

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 07:34 AM

Valin, have you seen this:
Mindset List: Class of 2016 doesn’t use radios or watch TVs, and sees women as leaders

They’re also less likely to identify with a specific religion. As item No. 3 notes, biblical terms such as “forbidden fruit,” ‘’the writing on the wall” and “good Samaritan” are unknown to most of them.
“When I teach Shakespeare or Milton there are a lot of biblical allusions,” said McBride, an English professor, “and I have to explain them all.”
------------------------------------------------
Rush talked about it today and I thought it pretty well makes the point that yes we stand on the hinge of history.

Horribly sad and tragic for us all.



When we were in school (shortly after the glaciers retreated Posted Image ) How many people actually knew about Shakespeare or Milton? I when to what was for all practical purposes a college prep school, and I'd say most of my class mates only knew as much as it took to pass the course...then promptly forgot it...I know I had to relearn a lot of that.
OTOH today there are places like ShakespeareAndMore & Full: The Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan

Keep in mind....
"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to heaven, we were all going direct the other way - in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only."
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

BTW Thanks for posting to this thread.

#51 Valin

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 06:03 PM

The Untapped Potential of the Mobile Phone
Beth Hoffman,

Ready for some mind blowing statistics?

A World Bank report says there are now 6 billion phones in use around the world, and an estimated 70 percent of the world’s poorest people (and who also, not coincidentally, work in agriculture) have access to them. The developing world is now using mobile phones at higher rates than those in developed nations – 96 percent of people in Indonesia and 89 percent of those in Kenya text.

To me, there is perhaps no trend more interesting and yet continuously ignored by the vast majority of western techies than this. The amount of information shared, not via Facebook, Pinterest or on ipads, but using simple SMS messaging is staggering. And the amount of opportunity for entrepreneurs looking to help those in need is enormous.

Thus far, most mobile knowledge sharing in developing nations has focused on sending pricing information to farmers about going market rates. Additionally, disease and weather data is also frequently shared via mobile phones, alerting farmers when to spray pesticides or harvest crops. Farmers then use chemicals more sparingly and make more money by harvesting crops at the right time.

(Snip)


Posted Image

#52 clearvision

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 06:21 PM

:) Gr8 Rtcl thx V

#53 righteousmomma

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 05:55 AM

LOL , Clearvision.

Valin, you are most welcome about my posting here. ( or should I have said: " No problem" - instead of "You are welcome."

So - on the hinge of history I throw out a term for you - post modernism and Christianity.

#54 Valin

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 07:41 AM

LOL , Clearvision.

Valin, you are most welcome about my posting here. ( or should I have said: " No problem" - instead of "You are welcome."

So - on the hinge of history I throw out a term for you - post modernism and Christianity.


Anyone who says they know what is going to happen, do me a favor and smack them up side the head hard for me...thanks. Not that it will do any good.
Post modernism an idea who's time has come...and gone....thankfully.
Christianity OTOH having been around for just a bit longer (Posted Image ) will continue to go on (stumbling around as we do). The question is...What Will It Look Like, what will the worship services be like, how will they view/relate (?) to the world? One of the things that has happened in the last 100 or so years is The Church has gotten a lot less white, and that will have a huge influence on The Church.
Quick story in 1920 Mom and Dad got married, Mom's family were Baptists and Dad's Catholic...huge major scandal in Lisbon ND....becoming Papists! Lackeys of Rome!! I mean this sort of thing just wasn't done. That sort of attitude (and worse) was very prevalent, by both Catholics and Protestants...and not that long ago. So given we are now talking influences coming into The Church for completely different cultures who will this change The Church...change it will, make no mistake.

#55 righteousmomma

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 08:50 AM

Afraid post modernism has not come and gone.
It is here and now and the danger is clear and present.

Edited to say that because of the huge and very diverse understanding of the terminology perhaps I should have left off the "ism" and just said post modern.

#56 Valin

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 07:34 PM

Just in case you're starting to feel good.





Have A Nice Day.

#57 Valin

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 05:35 AM

Harvard Is Now Online

This week brings the official launch of Harvard and MIT’s EdX program. According to BostInno (h/t John Ellis), the new program is off to a good start, with more than 100,000 students already registered for the first courses. And as students and teachers become acclimated to the platform, Harvard will continue to tailor the program to meet the changing needs of online learners:

(Snip)

Online education has made great strides this year. We’re happy to see one of America’s oldest and most prestigious universities joining in. Continued experimentation will lead to a better product as institutions learn from and compete with each other. It’s an exciting time to be learning online.


#58 nickydog

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 08:25 AM

We had an AF Academy senior over for dinner last Sunday. He is going into cyber warfare when he graduates and is absolutely brilliant in an unconventional sort of way. I invited him to come to the house if he needs a quiet place to study and showed him a table in the basement where he could spread out his "stuff." Then I realized much to my embarrassment that all he would need to "spread out" was his laptop. I was imagining papers, books, pens, pencils, etc. Posted Image As my husband, the cadet, and I conversed the cadet was constantly looking up stuff on his iphone to facilitate the conversation, whether it was the author of a book or the address and map to a local restaurant. It made me realize how totally different his world is from mine.

#59 Valin

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 05:20 AM

We had an AF Academy senior over for dinner last Sunday. He is going into cyber warfare when he graduates and is absolutely brilliant in an unconventional sort of way. I invited him to come to the house if he needs a quiet place to study and showed him a table in the basement where he could spread out his "stuff." Then I realized much to my embarrassment that all he would need to "spread out" was his laptop. I was imagining papers, books, pens, pencils, etc. Posted Image As my husband, the cadet, and I conversed the cadet was constantly looking up stuff on his iphone to facilitate the conversation, whether it was the author of a book or the address and map to a local restaurant. It made me realize how totally different his world is from mine.


A question occurred to me the other day. Given there is a whole new world being born, but in our heads are we still thinking like it is the 1950's-60's? Just one of those questions that pops into my (so called) mind.



#60 nickydog

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 10:29 PM

I think I've moved beyond the '50's and '60's but am darn sure I'm not very far into the 21st century.





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